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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Richmond, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Confederate Memorial Chapel

R. E. Lee Camp, No.1

 

—Confederate Soldiers’ Home —

 
Confederate Memorial Chapel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, April 16, 2011
1. Confederate Memorial Chapel Marker
Inscription. Between 1885 and 1941 the present-day location of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts was the site of a large residential complex for poor and infirm Confederate veterans of the Civil War. Established by R. E. Lee Camp, No. 1, Confederate Veterans, the camp was built with private funds, including donations from former Confederate and Union soldiers alike. At peak occupancy, residents numbered just over three hundred; altogether a total of nearly three thousand veterans from thirty-three states called the camp home. From the camp’s earliest years, the Commonwealth of Virginia helped fund the institution. When the last resident died in 1941, the Commonwealth gained ownership of the site and designated it as the Confederate Memorial Park.

Dedicated in 1877 to the Confederate war dead, this nondenominational chapel served as a place of worship for the residents of R. E. Lee Camp, No. 1. Funded by donations from veterans and private citizens of the Commonwealth, it was designed by architect Marion J. Dimmock in the Carpenter-Gothic style. The interior features hand-hewn pews, eight commemorative stained-glass windows, and a bell that once tolled the day’s hours. In the postwar era of reconciliation, Union veterans from Lynn, Massachusetts, donated the organ. By the time the camp closed fifty-four years later, the chapel had hosted
Veterans paying their respects. image. Click for full size.
2. Veterans paying their respects.
This watercolor by Margaret May Dashiell depicts a line of veterans paying respects at the flag-draped coffin of a colleague. The particularly solemn scene is among the artist’s many sketches of the soldiers’ home residents from the 1920s and 1930s. VMFA, Gift of Mrs. William A. Archer.
approximately 1,700 funeral services for the former soldiers.
 
Erected 2011 by Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.
 
Location. 37° 33.347′ N, 77° 28.561′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Virginia. Marker is on Grove Avenue west of North Colonial Avenue, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Located behind the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2900 Grove Avenue, Richmond VA 23221, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Confederate Memorial Chapel (a few steps from this marker); Residential Life at R. E. Lee Camp, No.1 (within shouting distance of this marker); The Home For Needy Confederate Women (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Robinson House (about 600 feet away); Arnold’s Picket Driven In (approx. 0.2 miles away); Virginia Historical Society (approx. ¼ mile away); Memorial Bell Tower (approx. 0.4 miles away); Stonewall Jackson (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Richmond.
 
Also see . . .
1. R. E. Lee Camp No. 1, Soldiers' Home - "Confederate War Memorial Chapel", Richmond. (Submitted on April 19, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
2. Confederate Memorial Chapel (pdf file)
Veterans reunite at the Soldiers' Home image. Click for full size.
3. Veterans reunite at the Soldiers' Home
The soldiers’ home was a favorite venue for both Confederate and Union veterans during joint reunions in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Pictured are members of R. E. Lee Camp, No. 1, alongside visitors from Lander Post, No. 5, G.A.R., of Lynn, Massachusetts, July 5, 1887. Photo: Library of Virginia
. National Register of Historic Places (Submitted on April 19, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkChurches, Etc.War, US Civil
 
Soldier's Home, Richmond, Va. image. Click for full size.
circa 1907
4. Soldier's Home, Richmond, Va.
This postcard view pictures the camp’s original entrance, which faced Grove Avenue. Carriages—and later automobiles—entered and proceeded north around a large oval drive to access the various buildings, including Robinson House (then called Fleming Hall) at the opposite end. Photo: Special Collections and Archives, James Branch Cabell Library, Virginia Commonwealth University - "Rarely Seen Richmond: Early twentieth century Richmond as seen through vintage postcards"
Confederate Memorial Chapel Markers image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, April 16, 2011
5. Confederate Memorial Chapel Markers
Confederate Memorial Chapel image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, April 16, 2011
6. Confederate Memorial Chapel
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 656 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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