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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Alexandria, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Gazette House

 
 
Gazette House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Ronald J. Baumgarten, Jr.
1. Gazette House Marker
Inscription. This building dates to 1801. Between 1852-1911 the Alexandria Gazette newspaper was printed here. In 1862 while Alexandria was occupied by the North during the Civil War, Union soldiers burned this building because it was reported here that St. Paul Church's minister refused to say a prayer for President Lincoln during Sunday services. Restored 1865-67. Facade replaced in 1922.
 
Location. 38° 48.195′ N, 77° 2.593′ W. Marker is in Alexandria, Virginia. Click for map. Marker is on Prince Street between S. Fairfax and S. Royal Streets. Marker is at or near this postal address: 310 Prince Street, Alexandria VA 22314, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Green & Brother Furniture (within shouting distance of this marker); Residence of General William Brown, M.D. (within shouting distance of this marker); Home of Elisha Cullen Dick (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Fairfax House (about 400 feet away); The Bank of Potomac Building (about 400 feet away); Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary (about 400 feet away); Home of Dr. James Craik (about 500 feet away); "For God and Country" (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Alexandria.
 
More about this marker.
Gazette House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 2, 2014
2. Gazette House Marker
The marker is located close to St. Paul's, at 228 S. Pitt Street.
 
Regarding Gazette House. According to the website of St. Paul's Episcopal Church (http://www.stpaulsalexandria.com/about-st-pauls/our-history.html), "[o]n Feb. 9, 1862, the Rev. K.J. Stewart was arrested by Union officers after failing to offer a prayer for the President during the height of the Civil War. A melee occurred in the sanctuary as the congregation attempted to defend its minister. On that same day, a warning was issued to 'females and others,' threatening arrest for offensive remarks and demonstrations—prompted, no doubt, by the actions of several St. Paul's ladies, including one who is said to have dropped her Prayer Book down from the gallery onto the head of an offending officer."

As noted in Occupied City: Portrait of Civil War Alexandria, Virginia by Jeremy J. Harvey, on Feb. 10, 1862, The Local News , published by Alexandria Gazette editor Edgar Snowden, printed an editorial condemning the 8th Illinois Cavalry for its role in Rev. Stewart's arrest. That night, the Gazette offices caught fire under mysterious circumstances. The fire destroyed the press and two neighboring buildings. (The marker directly attributes the fire to Union troops.) In response to the disorder surrounding the "Battle of St. Paul's
Former Alexandria Gazette building at 310 Prince St. image. Click for full size.
By Ronald J. Baumgarten, Jr.
3. Former Alexandria Gazette building at 310 Prince St.
Church," the Military Governor of Alexandria had the 8th Illinois Cavalry transferred out of Alexandria.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker.
 
Categories. CommunicationsWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Ronald J. Baumgarten, Jr. of McLean, Virginia. This page has been viewed 797 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Ronald J. Baumgarten, Jr. of McLean, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   3. submitted on , by Ronald J. Baumgarten, Jr. of McLean, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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