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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Dunn in Harnett County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Prelude to Averasboro

 
 
Prelude to Averasboro Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 18, 2006
1. Prelude to Averasboro Marker
Inscription. Late in 1864, two large Union armies, one in Virginia and the other in Georgia, were beginning to squeeze the Confederacy to defeat. Grant held Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia immobile at Petersburg, while Sherman, with 60,000 men, captured Atlanta and began the famous March to the Sea. Savannah fell by Christmas, 1864, and in mid-January, 1865, Sherman’s invasion of the Carolinas was begun. Columbia was captured on February 17th and Fayetteville on March 11th.

After leaving Fayetteville, Sherman sought to confuse General Joseph E. Johnston’s Confederate forces by making a pretended advance against Raleigh with the left wing of his army. This wing, commanded by General H. W. Slocum, began its march from Fayetteville along the Old Stage Road (present U.S. 401) which connected with Raleigh. Some 25 miles above Fayetteville the road branched near the village of Averasboro: one branch continued north to Raleigh, the other ran to the east towards Smithfield and Goldsboro. While Sherman’s left wing moved in the direction of Averasboro, his right wing advanced toward Goldsboro on a parallel road about 20 miles to the east.

The Confederates faced a difficult military situation in North Carolina by mid-March, 1865. General Johnston, ordered to stop Sherman, found his small army scattered over a wide area. It would take time to organize
Battle of Averasboro Markers image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 18, 2006
2. Battle of Averasboro Markers
the various units into an effective fighting force. The only corps in position to hinder the Union advance was the 6,500 man force under General W.J. Hardee. This corps was ordered to resist Slocum’s advance, thus began the Battle of Averasboro.
 
Erected 1961 by Archives and Highway Departments. Confederate Centennial Commission.
 
Location. 35° 13.948′ N, 78° 40.717′ W. Marker is near Dunn, North Carolina, in Harnett County. Marker is at the intersection of Burnett Road (North Carolina Route 82) and Ross West Road, on the right when traveling south on Burnett Road. Click for map. Marker is on Route 82, about 6 miles south of Dunn, NC. Marker is in this post office area: Dunn NC 28335, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Battle of Averasboro (here, next to this marker but has been reported missing); Federal Hospital (within shouting distance of this marker); Federal Artillery (approx. one mile away); Oak Grove (approx. 1.1 miles away); David M. Williams (approx. 1.2 miles away); Confederate First Line (approx. 1.3 miles away); Taliaferro’s Division (approx. 1.3 miles away); 20th Corps (approx. 1.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Dunn.
 
Also see . . .
Prelude to Averasboro Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, April 20, 2011
3. Prelude to Averasboro Marker
Now located next to the Smith house at 35 13 56.79N, 78 40 34.28W. Ross West Road in the background/house is to the right.

1. Averasboro Battlefield and Museum. (Submitted on March 1, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
2. Prelude to the Battle of Averasboro. North Carolina History Project website. (Submitted on December 23, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Prelude to Averasboro Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, April 20, 2011
4. Prelude to Averasboro Marker
Located next to the Smith house, future home of the Transportation Museum, owned & operated by the Averasboro Battlefield Commission, Inc.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,161 times since then and 3 times this year. Last updated on , by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4. submitted on , by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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