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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Trenton in Mercer County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Who, What and Where were Sanhickans?

 
 
Who, What and Where were Sanhickans? Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
1. Who, What and Where were Sanhickans? Marker
Inscription. The Sanhickans were a band of the Algonquian-speaking Lenape that occupied the Middle Delaware valley at the time of European contact in the 17th century. The Lenape territory ranged from the Atlantic coastline inland up into the Delaware, Raritan and Lower Hudson valleys. The Sanhickans were frequently at war with their Lenape neighbors, the Manhattans, who controlled territory to the northeast.

Sanhickans, spelled in various ways (Sankikans, Stankekans, Zanckikan), was also the name given to the village occupied by this Lenape band. The village was spread across both sides of the Delaware River around and opposite the mouth of the Assunpink Creek, and apparently extended on to islands in the river and as far downstream as Crosswicks Creek. Sanhickans served as a base camp for Native Americans exploiting resources in the surrounding area and was well situated to take advantage of rock outcrops suitable for stone tool manufacture, clay for pottery making, fish that spawned here at the head of tide, and plants and animals in the floodplain habitat.

Two clusters of longhouses marked as “Stankekans” are shown, one on each side of the Delaware River, on a Swedish map of 1616. Today the sites of these Sanhickans settlements lie beneath the urban landscape of South Trenton and Morrisville. Traces of Sanhickans
The four subject markers under the Pre-17th Century Arch image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
2. The four subject markers under the Pre-17th Century Arch
occupation have been found in archaeological excavations along Route 29 near the Mercer County Waterfront Park. Links to learn more – New Jersey State Museum, Trenton; Churchville Nature Center, Bucks County
 
Erected 2004 by New Jersey Department of Transportation.
 
Location. 40° 11.888′ N, 74° 45.499′ W. Marker is in Trenton, New Jersey, in Mercer County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 29. Click for map. This marker is part of South River Walk Park which is built over Route 29. Marker is in this post office area: Trenton NJ 08611, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Native Americans Exchange Furs for European Goods (here, next to this marker); What happened to the Lenape? (here, next to this marker); Native American Artifacts – Clubs to Prehistory (here, next to this marker); Europeans at the Falls of the Delaware (here, next to this marker); Quakers Lead the Settlement of West Jersey (here, next to this marker); The West Jersey Proprietors Rule (here, next to this marker); William Trent of Trentís Town (here, next to this marker); Pre-17th Century Trenton Timeline (here, next to this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Trenton.
 
More about this marker. This is one of 4 subject markers under the pre-17th Century Arch.
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 952 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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