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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Trenton in Mercer County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Native American Artifacts – Clubs to Prehistory

 
 
Native American Artifacts – Clubs to Prehistory Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
1. Native American Artifacts – Clubs to Prehistory Marker
Inscription. Artifacts recovered from prehistoric archaelogical sites, especially stone tools and ceramic pots, contain vital information about the living habits and age of Native American cultures. If the soil conditions allow, other materials – such as wood, bone, shell, textiles and environmental evidence – can also survive to give a more complete picture of Native American life. The scientific study of artifacts works alongside present-day Native American cultural traditions to help us understand human existence in North America before European colonization.

Many stone tools, notably spear points and arrowheads, use carefully selected raw materials and have distinctive shapes. The shape and style of stone tools often reflect how they were made and used and can signify a particular cultural tradition. Changes in shape and style can be traced over time and used as a means of dating archaeological sites.

Native Americans first made storage and cooking pots out of organic materials, like wood, hide and reeds, and soft, easily carved rock such as steatite (soapstone). Ceramic pots formed from slabs or coils of clay and then fired to hold their shape were introduced in the Woodland Period. Styles of manufacture and decoration evident in Native American pottery are useful in distinguishing cultural groups and tracing trade.

Links
Native American Artifacts – Clubs to Prehistory Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
2. Native American Artifacts – Clubs to Prehistory Marker
Shapes and styles of Native American stone tools and pottery change over time to help us date archaological sites.
to learn more – New Jersey State Museum, Trenton; Rankokus Reservation, Westampton Township
 
Erected 2004 by New Jersey Department of Transportation.
 
Location. 40° 11.888′ N, 74° 45.499′ W. Marker is in Trenton, New Jersey, in Mercer County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 29. Click for map. This marker is part of South River Walk Park which is built over Route 29. Marker is in this post office area: Trenton NJ 08611, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Who, What and Where were Sanhickans? (here, next to this marker); Native Americans Exchange Furs for European Goods (here, next to this marker); What happened to the Lenape? (here, next to this marker); Europeans at the Falls of the Delaware (here, next to this marker); Quakers Lead the Settlement of West Jersey (here, next to this marker); The West Jersey Proprietors Rule (here, next to this marker); William Trent of Trentís Town (here, next to this marker); Pre-17th Century Trenton Timeline (here, next to this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Trenton.
 
More about this marker. This is one of 4 subject markers under the pre-17th Century Arch.
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
The four subject markers under the Pre-17th Century Arch image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
3. The four subject markers under the Pre-17th Century Arch
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,326 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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