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Locust Grove in Orange County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Mine Run Campaign

Meade vs. Lee

 
 
The Mine Run Campaign Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, April 29, 2011
1. The Mine Run Campaign Marker
Inscription. “The promptness with which this unexpected attack was met and repulsed reflects great credit upon General Johnson and the officers and men of his division.” — Gen. Robert E. Lee, CSA

“The delay in the movements of the Third Corps, and, particularly the failure to affect a junction at Robertson’s Tavern, was one of the primary causes of the failure of the recent movement.” — Gen. George Gordon Meade, USA

Eager to strike Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia before winter, Union Gen. George Gordon Meade planned a flanking movement across the Rapidan River late in 1863. Meade intended to force the Southerners to abandon their strong defensive position along the upper Rapidan. Success depended on the timely movement of the different portions of his army and their juncture at Locust Grove, south of the river.

The Mine Run Campaign began on November 26, 1863. Rain, bad roads, and an inadequate knowledge of the terrain hindered Meade’s movements. After long delays and before the Union forces could assemble at Locust Grove, elements of the Union and Confederate armies clashed here at Payne’s Farm on November 27. By the next day, Confederate forces had established a seemingly impregnable line of defenses behind Mine Run, a tributary of the Rapidan.
The Mine Run Campaign Marker image. Click for full size.
2. The Mine Run Campaign Marker
The Mine Run Campaign highlighted the cultures of its armies and commanders. The relatively conservative Gen. George G. Meade (right), contrasted sharply with his daring adversary, Gen. Robert E. Lee. Courtesy Library of Congress
Meade ordered his army back across the Rapidan River and into winter camp. After more than 1,900 combined casualties, both armies returned to the positions they occupied before the Mine Run Campaign.
 
Erected 2011 by The Civil War Trust and Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 19.937′ N, 77° 49.712′ W. Marker is in Locust Grove, Virginia, in Orange County. Marker is at the intersection of Zoar Road (Virginia Route 611) and Zoar School Road, on the left when traveling north on Zoar Road. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 31334 Zoar Road, Locust Grove VA 22508, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Mine Run Campaign (here, next to this marker); The Battle of Payne’s Farm (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Payne’s Farm (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Payne’s Farm (approx. Ľ mile away); a different marker also named The Battle of Payne’s Farm (approx.
The Mine Run Campaign Marker image. Click for full size.
3. The Mine Run Campaign Marker
Union Gen. George G. Meade planned a flanking maneuver across the lightly guarded lower fords of the Rapidan River to put his Army of the Potomac squarely on Gen. Robert E. Lee’s right flank.
0.3 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Payne’s Farm (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Payne’s Farm (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Payne’s Farm (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Locust Grove.
 
Also see . . .
1. Mine Run. Civil War Trust (Submitted on May 1, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

2. Mine Run. CWSAC Battle Summary (Submitted on May 2, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The Army of the Potomac at Mine Run image. Click for full size.
1864
4. The Army of the Potomac at Mine Run
General Warren's troops attacking [Robertson's Tavern, an old Virginia hostelry]. Wood engraving after sketch by A.R. Waud. Harper's Weekly, v. 8, (1864 January 2), p. 12. Library of Congress [LC-USZ62-88336]

The site of Robinson’s Tavern (called Robertson’s Tavern by the soldiers) at Locust Grove is approximately two miles south of Payne’s Farm. The tavern building itself still stands but was moved some 250 yards north on Zoar Road (present-day State Route 611).
The Mine Run Campaign Markers image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, April 30, 2011
5. The Mine Run Campaign Markers
Zoar Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, April 29, 2011
6. Zoar Baptist Church
The Civil War Trails Mine Run Campaign markers and the Civil War Trust Payne's Farm Battlefield trailhead are located in front of the church.
Payne's Farm Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, April 30, 2011
7. Payne's Farm Battlefield
Civil War Trust<br>Saving America’s Hallowed Ground image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, April 29, 2011
8. Civil War Trust
Saving America’s Hallowed Ground
The Civil War Trust is America’s largest nonprofit organization devoted to saving our nation’s endangered Civil War battlefields. During more than twenty years crusading for preservation, The Trust has rescued from sprawl and development more than 30,000 acres of hallowed ground in twenty states.

Sadly, only one in five Civil War battlefields, so vital to our national heritage, is protected. Nearly thirty acres of contested ground are lost every day. If not for the concerted efforts of the Civil War Trust and its partners, the very land you stand on might be a strip mall, a housing development, or a highway interchange. Already, more than 20 percent of Civil War battlefields have been lost forever. Without well-funded, deliberate, and urgent action, future generations will be denied even more of these places where history happened and heroes walked.

Join the fight to save America’s remaining hallowed ground. Tb learn more about the Civil War Trust and how you can help protect battlefields just like this one, visit us on-line at www.civilwar.org or call toll free at (888) 606-1400.

[caption] The Civil War Trust and its partners were able to preserve the beautiful land here at Payne’s Farm forever. - Photo courtesy Garry Adleman

This historic property is preserved thanks in part to a Land and Water Conservation Fund grant administered by the Department of the Interior, National Park Service, American Battlefield Protection Program. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 836 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   7, 8. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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