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Bowie in Cochise County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Centennial of Chiricahua Apache/U.S. Cessation of Hostilities 1886

 
 
Centennial of Chiricahua Apache/U.S. Cessation of Hostilities 1886 Marker - Side 1 image. Click for full size.
By James Nuti, February 25, 2011
1. Centennial of Chiricahua Apache/U.S. Cessation of Hostilities 1886 Marker - Side 1
English Translation
Inscription.
[Side 1: In English :]
September 4-8, 1986, Arizonans marked the return of the Chiricahua Ex-Prisoners of War and their descendants in ceremonies that completed a spiritual circle. We remembered and reflected on the clash between National Expansion and the Chiricahua's determination to resist and remain free on their land, and on how so few could have so great and lasting impact on so many. Together we struggled with notions of equality and cultural differences and achieved a broader perspective on raiding, ware fare, deportation, imprisonment and the repatriation of the Chiricahua People.

[Side 2 - Apache Translation:]
Editors Note: Click on photo to see text

[Side 3 - Artwork panel depicting members of the Apache Tripe]

[Side 4 - The Proclamation]
Chiricahua - Centennial
The proclamation describes the reasons for the 1986 commemoration. The Apache-language marker, translated into English, embodies the feelings of the 200 Chiricahua Apaches who attended. Their own words in their own language symbolizes their lasting presence in Arizona.

The rock hammer imbedded in the monument is from Tres Castillos, Mexico, and represents the Warm Springs Apaches. The mano and metate speak of a more peaceful time before contact and conflict.
Side 2 - Apache Translation image. Click for full size.
By James Nuti, February 25, 2011
2. Side 2 - Apache Translation
The four colored rocks designate the points of the Chiricahua compass. The four rocks at the base were blessed by the Chiricahuas for their centennial return. The rock on the top comes from Skeleton Canyon, site of Naiche and Geronimoís groupís final surrender and starting point of the commemorative military march. The railroad spike is from the Bowie station, scene of the Chiricahuasí deportation. The sculpture was created by Chiricahua artist Allan Houser, whose father was a prisoner of war.


Office of the Governor State of Arizona
Bruce Babbitt – Governor
HEREAS a continuous state of war existed in the area of Arizona, New Mexico, and the states of Sonora and Chihuacua in Mexico for three hundred and fifty years, and

WHEREAS, the final surrender of Naiche and Geronimo's group and deportation of the entire Chirichua Apache Tribe in 1886 marked the end of this war, the coming of a lasting peace to Arizona, and the beginning of 27 years of imprisonment for the Chirichua, and

WHEREAS, September 4, 1986 will be the 100th anniversary of the Chirichua capitulation;

NOW therefore, I, Bruce Babbitt, Governor of the State of Arizona, and for the citizen of this great State, do hereby welcome the Chirichua ex prisoners of war and all other members of this tribe to Arizona and do hereby proclaim
Side 3 - Artwork image. Click for full size.
By James Nuti, February 25, 2011
3. Side 3 - Artwork
Thursday, the fourth day of September 1986 as the

Centennial of the Chirichua Apache surrender and Imprisonment

AND call upon all persons to observe the significance of these events and to learn of the History and Culture of the Apache people and,

TO participate in centennial events conducted under the auspices of the Arizona Historical Society and the National Park Service In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused to be affixed the Great Seal of the State of Arizona
Bruce Babbitt
Governor
Done at the Capitol in Phoenix on this sixteenth day of July in the year of Our Lord One Thousand Nine Hundred and Eighty Six and of the Independence of the United States of America Two Hundred and Tenth

Attest Rose Mofford
Secretary of State


Translation
On September 4-8, 1986, we, the proud ex-prisoners of war and descendants of a great race, came to the commemoration. Our emotions were stirred as history was recalled. We shed tears as family names were read. Further generations shall know of the past, for we will hold fast to their rights. In our hearts we have always been free, because the spirit of the Chiricahua remains among us.
Mescalero-Chiricahua

We had the first opportunity to retrace the steps
Side 4 -The Proclamation image. Click for full size.
By James Nuti, February 25, 2011
4. Side 4 -The Proclamation
and finish the dream of our grandmothers and grandfathers – to return to the land so precious to them that they surrendered and gave twenty-seven years of their lives as prisoners of war for 15,000,000 acres of mountains, streams, and land – you all call desert but to them was life.
Mildred Imach Clegburn, Grandchild Born Prisoner of War
Chiricahua-Warm Springs Apache

 
Erected 1988 by Arizona Corrals of the Westerners and The Arizona Historical Society.
 
Location. 32° 19.552′ N, 109° 29.419′ W. Marker is in Bowie, Arizona, in Cochise County. Marker is on West Fifth Street, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. The Marker is located in the North West corner of the Bowie School grounds. The schools are located between Central Avenue and Lincoln Avenue on Fifth Street. During school hours check in at the administration building prior to going to the marker. Marker is at or near this postal address: 315 West 5th Street, Bowie AZ 85605, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Old Fort Bowie (approx. 0.3 miles away); Fort Bowie (approx. 0.3 miles away); Apache Pass - A Corridor Through Time (approx.
Centennial of Chiricahua Apache/U.S. Cessation of Hostilities 1886 Markers and Monument image. Click for full size.
By James Nuti, February 25, 2011
5. Centennial of Chiricahua Apache/U.S. Cessation of Hostilities 1886 Markers and Monument
11.9 miles away); Mining Cabin (approx. 12 miles away); Apache Pass (approx. 12 miles away); Parke Camp Site (approx. 12.3 miles away); The Bascom Affair (approx. 12.4 miles away); Bascom-Cochise Meeting Site (approx. 12.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Bowie.
 
Categories. Native AmericansWars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by James Nuti of Bisbee, Arizona. This page has been viewed 972 times since then and 48 times this year. Last updated on , by James Nuti of Bisbee, Arizona. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by James Nuti of Bisbee, Arizona. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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