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Trenton in Mercer County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battles of Trenton, Turning Point of the Revolution

 
 
The Battles of Trenton, Turning Point of the Revolution Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
1. The Battles of Trenton, Turning Point of the Revolution Marker
Inscription. By December of 1776, the Continental Army had withdrawn in disarray from New York, across Central New Jersey and the Delaware River into Pennsylvania. The British were in complacent pursuit, confident that it was only a matter of weeks or months before General Washington capitulated. Then, in a remarkable turn of events, on Christmas Day and the day following, the American forces regrouped and launched a surprise counter-attack on Trenton, thereby infusing new life into the Revolutionary cause and changing the course of the war.

The First Battle of Trenton was preceded by Washington’s nighttime crossing of the Delaware at McKonkey’s Ferry, present-day Washington Crossing, and a nine-mile march to the edge of town. In the early morning of December 26 the American troops caught the British-paid Hessian garrison at the Trenton Barracks unawares and soon forced their surrender. Washington withdrew most of his troops across the Delaware into Pennsylvania again to plan his next move.

A week later, as an advance British contingent entered Trenton, Washington successfully defended the South Broad Street crossing of the Assunpink Creek. This action, the Second Battle of Trenton, bought the American forces valuable time in which to set up another successful surprise attack on the main body of British troops at Princeton the following
The Battles of Trenton, Turning Point of the Revolution Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
2. The Battles of Trenton, Turning Point of the Revolution Marker
day. This series of engagements in Trenton and Princeton dramatically boosted American morale and showed the vulnerability of the ponderous British Army to fast-moving and well-chosen assaults by Washington’s troops.

Links to learn more - Old Barracks, Trenton; Princeton Battlefield, Princeton; Washington Crossing State Park (New Jersey and Pennsylvania); David Library, Washington Crossing, Pennsylvania
 
Erected 2004 by New Jersey Department of Transportation.
 
Location. 40° 11.899′ N, 74° 45.505′ W. Marker is in Trenton, New Jersey, in Mercer County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 29. Click for map. This marker is part of South River Walk Park which is built over Route 29. Marker is in this post office area: Trenton NJ 08611, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Trenton’s Early Houses of Worship (here, next to this marker); Slavery – An “Odious and Disgraceful” Practice (here, next to this marker); From Federal City to State Capital (here, next to this marker); 18th Century Trenton Timeline (a few steps from this marker); 17th Century Trenton Timeline (a
The Battles of Trenton, Turning Point of the Revolution Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
3. The Battles of Trenton, Turning Point of the Revolution Marker
few steps from this marker); 19th Century Trenton Timeline (a few steps from this marker); Who, What and Where were Sanhickans? (a few steps from this marker); Native Americans Exchange Furs for European Goods (a few steps from this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Trenton.
 
More about this marker. This is one of 4 subject markers under the 18th Century Arch.

On the marker are two drawings of events during the Battles of Trenton.
The leftmost drawing is described as, "General George Washington orders the removal of dying Hessian Colonel Johann Rall from the battlefield following the American victory at the Battle of Trenton in December 26, 1776."
The drawing on the right is described as, "The mortal wounding of General Hugh Mercer (for whom Mercer County is named) at the Battle of Princeton on January 3, 1777."
 
Categories. MilitaryNotable EventsNotable PersonsWar, US Revolutionary
 
The Battle of Trenton Reenactment image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, December 29, 2012
4. The Battle of Trenton Reenactment
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 3,633 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey.   4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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