Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Philadelphia in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

National Funeral For President Washington

 
 
National Funeral For President Washington Marker image. Click for full size.
By John Intile, May 27, 2011
1. National Funeral For President Washington Marker
Inscription. George Washington died on Dec. 14, 1799. Congress set Dec. 26 as a day of formal mourning in Philadelphia, the nation's capital from 1790 to 1800. The national funeral was in Zion Lutheran Church--located at this site, 1766-1870-- and among those attending was President John Adams. In his funeral oration, congressman Henry Lee spoke the famous tribute: “First in war, first in peace and first in the hearts of his countrymen."
 
Erected 1999 by Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
 
Location. 39° 57.175′ N, 75° 8.793′ W. Marker is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia County. Marker is at the intersection of 4th street and Arch Street on 4th street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Philadelphia PA 19106, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Kahal Kodosh Mikveh Israel (within shouting distance of this marker); Benjamin Franklin (within shouting distance of this marker); Arch Street Friends (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Arch Street Meeting House (about 300 feet away); Friends Meeting (about 300
The marker facing South-East. The construction behind the marker is modern. image. Click for full size.
By John Intile, May 27, 2011
2. The marker facing South-East. The construction behind the marker is modern.
feet away); Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. (about 400 feet away); Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society (about 500 feet away); Christ Church Burial Ground (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Philadelphia.
 
Regarding National Funeral For President Washington. On Thursday, December 12th, 1799 Washington was inspecting his grounds on horseback in a freezing rain at his Mount Vernon estate in Virginia. The following morning, he awoke complaining of a severe sore throat and hoarseness which worsened as the day progressed. At approximately 3 AM Saturday, he awoke his wife Martha, telling her that he felt ill. Several eminent doctors were called who diagnosed Washington with "the quinsy" (probably acute peritonsillar abscess or acute epiglottitis) and treated him by, among other remedies, "bleeding" which most likely only served to further weaken the former President. As the day progressed, Washington's breathing became extremely labored, most likely due to swelling of his epiglottis, and, despite his doctors' efforts, his condition rapidly deteriorated and his breathing became agonal until he finally expired at approximately 10 PM, Saturday Dec. 14th,
George Washington image. Click for full size.
Miniature by Robert Field via Wikipedia Commons, 1800
3. George Washington
Martha Washington herself commissioned painter Robert Field in 1800 to paint a group of miniatures as mementos for friends and family, to commemorate the revered General and President on the one-year anniversary of his death.
1799 at age 67. He was interred in a tomb at Mount Vernon on Wednesday, Dec. 18, 1799
 
Also see . . .
1. National Funeral For President Washington - Behind the Marker. ExplorePAHistory.com (Submitted on July 21, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.) 

2. George Washington at FindAGrave.com. (Submitted on July 21, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by John Intile of Toms River, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 495 times since then and 10 times this year. Last updated on , by John Intile of Toms River, New Jersey. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by John Intile of Toms River, New Jersey.   3. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement