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Trenton in Mercer County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Roebling …… Wire Rope and American Bridges

 
 
Roebling …… Wire Rope and American Bridges Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
1. Roebling …… Wire Rope and American Bridges Marker
Inscription. One of the iron and steel products for which Trenton became best known was wire rope. Originally developed as a stronger and more durable alternative to hemp, wire rope was first successfully produced in America in the early 1840s by John A. Roebling, a recent German immigrant then living in Western Pennsylvania. Early in his career Roebling worked as an engineer on the design and construction of canals and railroads in Pennsylvania. His main interest, however, lay in bridge technology and, in particular, in the development of the suspension bridge. It was in this capacity that he and his Trenton-based company became world-renowned.

John Roebling relocated to Trenton in 1848, lured by the city’s advantageous location within the canal and rail network, and by the prospect of an abundant supply of wire from the mills of the Trenton Iron Company and easily obtainable coal from the Lehigh Valley. He set up his wire rope factory on the outskirts of Trenton, adjacent to the Delaware and Raritan Canal and Camden and Amboy Railroad. Roebling rapidly expanded his works to meet an increasing national demand foe cable, rigging and wire fencing. A demand that continued through the Civil War Era with the Union’s need for cable and rope for military bridges and ship.

The firm’s long-term reputation rested primarily on its role as
Roebling …… Wire Rope and American Bridges Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
2. Roebling …… Wire Rope and American Bridges Marker
The Williamsburg Bridge, a 1,600-foot span across the East River between Manhattan and Brooklyn, built 1896-1903 with wire rope supplied by John A. Roebling's Sons Company.
Inset is a portrait of John A. Roebling (1806-1869) Engineer, Inventor and Industrialist.
a designer, manufacturer and builder of suspension bridges. From John Roebling’s first commission, the construction of a suspension aqueduct over the Allegheny River in 1844 through the mid-20th Century, many of the country’s premier bridges display the stamp of the Roebling firm. John Roebling died in 1869, in the midst of designing the Brooklyn Bridge, whereupon the firm reorganized as the John A. Roebling’s Sons Company. As this entity, the company continued to grow, employing at its peak at the end of World War I around 10,000 workers at five factories in and around Trenton and in the company town of Roebling, New Jersey. Production extended well beyond the manufacture of suspension bridges to elevator and tramcar cable, wire cloth and electrical wire, but the post-World War II decline in heavy manufacturing eventually resulted in the sale of the firm to Colorado Fuel & Iron in 1953, and the final closure of all the Roebling works in 1973-74.

Links to learn more – Invention Factory, Trenton; Town of Roebling, New Jersey
 
Erected 2004 by New Jersey Department of Transportation.
 
Location. 40° 11.914′ N, 74° 45.507′ W. Marker is in Trenton, New Jersey, in Mercer County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 29. Click for map. This marker
The four subject markers under the 19th Century Arch image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
3. The four subject markers under the 19th Century Arch
is part of South River Walk Park which is built over Route 29. Marker is in this post office area: Trenton NJ 08611, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cooper & Hewitt ….. Iron & Steel (here, next to this marker); Canals and Railroads – Arteries to the Heart of Industrial Trenton (here, next to this marker); From Teacups to Toilets (here, next to this marker); 19th Century Trenton Timeline (a few steps from this marker); 20th Century (and later) Trenton Timeline (a few steps from this marker); Trenton’s Early Houses of Worship (within shouting distance of this marker); Slavery – An “Odious and Disgraceful” Practice (within shouting distance of this marker); The Battles of Trenton, Turning Point of the Revolution (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Trenton.
 
More about this marker. This is one of four subject markers under the 19th Century Arch.
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsIndustry & CommerceNotable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 3,283 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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