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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Pine Mountain in Harris County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

“This Was His Georgia”

 
 
“This Was His Georgia” Marker image. Click for full size.
J. J. Prats Postcard Collection “Color Photo by McElvain”
1. “This Was His Georgia” Marker
Inscription. During the 21 years (1924–1945) in which he was a constant visitor to Warm Springs, GA.,
Franklin D. Roosevelt
became familiar with the scenic beauties of field & forest in the environs. The splendid isolation of Dowdell’s Knob, with its vista of valley & cloud-land, was his favorite resort for recreation — an item of which was the outdoor fireplace, a monument to his further pleasure in the Georgia scene.

One of his last days was marked by a visit here in the glad April, for quiet contemplation and reverie — as weary Pilgrims of old came to the Delectable Mountains.
 
Erected by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 072-7.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 32° 50.403′ N, 84° 44.726′ W. Marker is near Pine Mountain, Georgia, in Harris County. Marker is on Dowdell Knob Road 1.4 miles south of Georgia Route 190. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Pine Mountain GA 31822, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Franklin D. Roosevelt (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named This Was His Georgia
Marker at Dowdell’s Knob image. Click for full size.
J. J. Prats Postcard Collection. “Color Photo by McElvain”
2. Marker at Dowdell’s Knob
Undated postcard has this legend “Franklin D. Roosevelt State Park on U.S. 27, three miles south of Pine Mountain, Ga. • Historical marker at the site where President Roosevelt often picnicked with family and friends. At lower left is stone grill that he used on such outings.” A ‘True-to-Life’ Natural Color Card by Florida Pre-Vues, New Port Richey, Florida — #4961-24
(within shouting distance of this marker); Dowdell's Knob (approx. 1.3 miles away); Longleaf Pine Planting (approx. 2.6 miles away); Roosevelt Farm (approx. 2.7 miles away); Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial Bridge (approx. 3.7 miles away); Franklin Delano Roosevelt (approx. 4.4 miles away); The Little White House (approx. 4.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Pine Mountain.
 
More about this marker. Unfortunately the date on this marker cannot be discerned from the photograph on the postcard.
 
Also see . . .  A President’s Place of Reflection. “President Roosevelt came to Dowdell’s Knob for the last time in April of 1945. Victory in World War II was becoming apparent and he asked his Secret Service agents to leave him alone there until they heard him sound the car horn. He sat in peace and absorbed the view in solitude. Roosevelt died at his nearby Little White House two days later.” (Submitted on June 28, 2009.) 
 
Categories. Natural FeaturesNotable PersonsNotable Places
 
Roosevelt's Georgia -- the View from Dowdell's Knob image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, March 8, 2000
3. Roosevelt's Georgia -- the View from Dowdell's Knob
Secret Service agents would remove the back seat from Roosevelt's Ford Convertible Sedan and place it on the ground, to allow the President to relax and enjoy this view of Pine Mountain Valley.
Roosevelt's Barbeque and the View from Dowdell's Knob image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, March 8, 2000
4. Roosevelt's Barbeque and the View from Dowdell's Knob
The Roosevelt Barbeque Grill had to be cemented up, to protect it from vandals. The view, from the approximate site of the marker, looks southeast into Pine Mountain valley.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,248 times since then and 7 times this year. Last updated on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   3, 4. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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