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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Walterboro in Colleton County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Tuskegee Airman of World War II

 
 
The Tuskegee Airman of World War II Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Stroud, circa May 2007
1. The Tuskegee Airman of World War II Marker
Inscription. In honor of the Tuskegee Airman, their instructors, and ground support personnel who participated in training for combat at the Walterboro Army Airfield during the Second World War.

Because of their heroic action in combat they were called Schwartz Vogelmenschen, "Black Bird Men", by the Germans who both feared and respected them. White American bomber crews, in reverence, referred to them as the "Red Tailed Angels," because of their tail assemblies and because of their reputation for not losing any aircraft to enemy fighters as they provided fighter coverage for missions over strategic targets in Europe.
 
Location. 32° 54.995′ N, 80° 38.262′ W. Marker is in Walterboro, South Carolina, in Colleton County. Marker is on Aviation Way, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is about two miles NE of Walterboro, in the Airport Park off Rt US 17. Follow the Tuskegee Airman Memorial signs to the area. Marker is at or near this postal address: 537 Aviation Way, Walterboro SC 29488, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Tuskegee Airmen (here, next to this marker); Walterboro Army Air Field (here, next to this marker); Prisoner Of War Camp and Camouflage School
The Tuskegee Airman Monument image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 13, 2009
2. The Tuskegee Airman Monument
The Tuskegee Memorial was dedicated in May 1997 to the determined young men who enlisted to become America's first Black Military Airmen.
(here, next to this marker); Walterboro Army Airfield (a few steps from this marker); The Beacon (a few steps from this marker); Anderson Field / Walterboro Army Air Field (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Walterboro Army Airfield (within shouting distance of this marker); Bethel Presbyterian Church (approx. 1.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Walterboro.
 
Also see . . .
1. Tuskegee Airmen, Inc. “They came from every section of the country, with large numbers coming from New York City, Washington, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia and Detroit. Each one possessed a strong personal desire to serve the United States of America at the best of his ability.” (Submitted on September 17, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. Nine myths about the TUSKEGEE AIRMEN,by Dr. Daniel L. Haulman. in light of the historical documentation available at the Air Force Historical Research Agency, and sources at the Air University Library, are not accurate. That documentation includes monthly histories of the 99th Fighter Squadron,
Walterboro Army Airfield Memorial Park image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 13, 2009
3. Walterboro Army Airfield Memorial Park
Tuskegee Airmen Memorial seen in background at left of flagpole
the 332d Fighter Group and the 477th Bombardment Group, the 332d Fighter Groupís daily narrative mission reports, orders issued by the Twelfth and Fifteenth Air Forces, Fifteenth Air Force mission folders, and missing air crew reports 1. The Myth of Inferiority 2. The Myth of “Never Lost a Bomber” 3. The Myth of the Deprived Ace 4. The Myth of Being First to Shoot Down German Jets 5. The Myth that the Tuskegee Airmen sank a German destroyer 6. The Myth of the “Great Train Robbery” 7. The Myth of Superiority 8. The Myth that the Tuskegee Airmen units were all black 9. The Myth that all Tuskegee Airmen were fighter pilots who flew red-tailed P-51s to escort bombers (Submitted on February 16, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsMilitaryWar, World II
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,554 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2, 3. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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