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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
North Olmsted in Cuyahoga County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Joseph Peake's Farm

ca. 1840-1863

 
 
Joseph Peake's Farm Marker (Side A) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 5, 2011
1. Joseph Peake's Farm Marker (Side A)
Inscription.
Side A:
Joseph Peake was born in Pennsylvania in 1792 and came to Ohio in 1809 with his parents and brother. They were the first African Americans to settle permanently in the Cleveland area. He was the son of George Peake, a runaway slave from Maryland, who fought on the British side at the Battle of Quebec in 1759 during the French and Indian War. A man with some means and talent, George Peake invented a stone hand mill for grinding corn, a labor-saving device that endeared the Peakes to their neighbors in western Cuyahoga County. Joseph Peake and his wife Eleanor, an African American from Delaware, bought land in the 1840s on the Mastick Plank Road and built a home near this marker.
(Continued on other side)

Side B:
(Continued from other side)
Peake family members were active in their community. Joseph voted in Olmsted Township elections and Eleanor was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The congregation met in the Union House of Worship at the eastern end of Butternut Ridge Road. Northern anti-slave Methodists formed the Wesleyan Church in 1843 and four years later the Olmsted Wesleyans built their own church in the northwestern area of the township. Defying the law, Wesleyans were known to hide runaway slaves in their homes and churches. According to stories told by their neighbors,
Joseph Peake's Farm Marker (Side B) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 5, 2011
2. Joseph Peake's Farm Marker (Side B)
the Peakes also helped escaped slaves who were traveling from Oberlin to Cleveland. The former Wesleyan Church is preserved at Frostville.
 
Erected 2008 by North Olmsted Landmarks Commission, Olmsted Historical Society and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 88-18.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 41° 25.102′ N, 81° 52.618′ W. Marker is in North Olmsted, Ohio, in Cuyahoga County. Marker is at the intersection of Mastick Road and Clague Road, on the right when traveling east on Mastick Road. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 23137 Mastick Road, North Olmsted OH 44070, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Parker Ranch (approx. 0.2 miles away); John J. Donnelly (approx. mile away); Coe Ridge (approx. 1.1 miles away); Butternut Ridge Cemetery 1835 (approx. 1.7 miles away); Bain Park Cabin (approx. 1.9 miles away); Springvale Ballroom (approx. 2 miles away); The Oxcart Library (approx. 2.6 miles away); The Ark (approx. 2.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in North Olmsted.
 
Also see . . .  African American in the Western Reserve
Joseph Peake's Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 5, 2011
3. Joseph Peake's Farm Marker
Looking east
. (Submitted on June 13, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. African AmericansAgricultureChurches, Etc.Settlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 631 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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