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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Prairie du Chien in Crawford County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Black Hawk's Surrender

 
 
Black Hawk's Surrender Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, June 18, 2011
1. Black Hawk's Surrender Marker
Inscription. On August 2, 1832, the Black Hawk War effectively ended when the U.S. Military massacred many followers of Sauk Indian leader Black Hawk at the Battle of Bad Axe, located about 35 miles north of here. Black Hawk, known as Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak, his advisor The Prophet and some of his followers, escaped north to a Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) village near Prairie La Crosse. There, One-Eyed Decorah, Chasja-ka, and other Ho-Chunk persuaded the fugitives to surrender to the American authorities. They journeyed down the Mississippi River to Prairie du Chien where Black Hawk and The Prophet were delivered to U.S. Indian Agent, Gen. Joseph Street. Attired in resplendent white deerskin clothing provided by the Ho-Chunk, Black Hawk formally surrendered to Gen. Street on August 27, 1832, and was briefly imprisoned at Fort Crawford under the command of Col. Zachary Taylor. Lt. Jefferson Davis was charged with transporting Black Hawk to Jefferson Barracks in St. Louis and Black Hawk was imprisoned there until the following spring when President Andrew Jackson ordered his release.

Erected 1999

 
Erected 1999 by the Wisconsin Historical Society. (Marker Number 431.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Black Hawk War, and the Wisconsin Historical Society marker
Black Hawk's Surrender Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, June 18, 2011
2. Black Hawk's Surrender Marker
series.
 
Location. 43° 2.564′ N, 91° 8.8′ W. Marker is in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, in Crawford County. Marker is on West Rice Street west of South Beaumont Road, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is at the Fort Crawford Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 717 South Beaumont Road, Prairie du Chien WI 53821, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. William Beaumont, M. D. (a few steps from this marker); Site of the Second Fort Crawford (a few steps from this marker); Museum of Medical Progress (within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing); Jefferson Davis (approx. 0.3 miles away); Pere Marquette and Sieur Jolliet (approx. half a mile away); Prairie du Chien (approx. half a mile away); Prairie du Chien Veterans Memorial (approx. 0.7 miles away); Veterans Memorial (approx. 0.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Prairie du Chien.
 
Also see . . .
1. Black Hawk (Sauk leader). Wikipedia entry. (Submitted on June 19, 2011.) 

2. Fort Crawford Museum. History of Fort Crawford. (Submitted on June 19, 2011.) 
 
Categories. Wars, US Indian
 
Plaque by Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, June 18, 2011
3. Plaque by Marker
This window was once part of the Second Fort Crawford located 100 yards north of this spot. The fort was finished in 1832 and was in use by the U.S. Army until 1856.
This was the fort "guard room" window, originally located mid-way in the west line (enlisted quarters) of barracks. Among the prisoners confined behind these bars were the famous Sac chiefs Blackhawk and The Prophet, who were delivered here for surrender to post commander Col. Zachary Taylor on Aug. 27, 1832, by the Winnebago chiefs One-eyed Decori and Chetar, plus lesser chiefs and the few remaining Sac and Fox braves who survived the so-called "Blackhawk War".
Note the hammered copper lettering in the window cap-stone. The artisan and date of this work are not known.
Plaque, Window, and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, June 18, 2011
4. Plaque, Window, and Marker
Displays by Museum image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, June 18, 2011
5. Displays by Museum
Nearby Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, June 18, 2011
6. Nearby Plaque
Stone Pillars
These thirteen stone pillars, in their original location, were porch supports for the Second Crawford Hospital, 1829.
Pillars with metal rings set in the top were later used as hitching posts.
Octagonal shapes were achieved by sawing the pillars vertically. The saw marks can still be seen on some. Historical records indicate that the pillars were made in St. Louis, Missouri, and shipped to Prairie du Chien by river packet.
Stone Pillars image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, June 18, 2011
7. Stone Pillars
The plaque is on the pillar in the foreground.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 916 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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