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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Auburn in Fauquier County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Neavil's Ordinary

 
 
Neavil's Ordinary Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
1. Neavil's Ordinary Marker
Inscription. Near here stood George Neavil's Ordinary, built at an early date and existing as late as 1792. George Washington and George William Fairfax on their way to the Shenandoah Valley stopped here in 1748.
 
Erected 1928 by Conservation & Development Commission. (Marker Number BX 7.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the George Washington Slept Here marker series.
 
Location. 38° 42.232′ N, 77° 41.582′ W. Marker is near Auburn, Virginia, in Fauquier County. Marker is at the intersection of Old Dumfries Road (County Route 667) and Taylor Road / Old Auburn Road (County Route 670), on the right when traveling north on Old Dumfries Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Catlett VA 20119, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Neavilís Mill (approx. 0.4 miles away); Battle of Coffee Hill (Second Battle of Auburn) (approx. half a mile away); Stuart's Bivouac (approx. one mile away); Grapewood Farm Engagement (approx. 2.3 miles away); Warrenton Cemetery (approx. 3.3 miles away); Greenwich
Neavil's Ordinary Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
2. Neavil's Ordinary Marker
(approx. 4 miles away); Stony Lonesome Farm (approx. 4 miles away); a different marker also named “Greenwich” (approx. 4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Auburn.
 
Regarding Neavil's Ordinary. One of the most important businesses in early America was the 'ordinary,' also called a tavern, a public house of entertainment, or an inn. In the earliest days of the colonies, the 'ordinary,' which stuck around longer in the south, by the end of the 17th century the word tavern displaced 'ordinary' along the eastern seaboard.

Colonial travel, whether by foot, horse, cart, wagon, or riding chair proved difficult and tedious. For people who lived nearby, the ordinary became a place to gossip, exchange news, transact business such as selling land, hold auctions for livestock, pick up mail, and talk politics. It might even be a place to scheme about independence from England.
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
Neavil's Mill image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
3. Neavil's Mill
To the west along Old Auburn Road is a recreation of Neavil's Mill. The Old Carolina Road, the main colonial era transportation route through this part of the county.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,514 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on December 24, 2016.
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