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Pittsburgh in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The King's Garden

Feeding Pittsburgh in the 18th Century

 
 
The King's Garden Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, June 20, 2011
1. The King's Garden Marker
Inscription. You are standing on what was once the parade ground of Fort Pitt, one of the largest military fortifications in 18th century North America. British and colonial American soldiers built this massive fort between 1759 and 1761 in order to control the strategic Forks of the Ohio River (now Point State Park). The town of Pittsburgh grew up around Fort Pitt.

To feed the growing population, Fort Pitt's British commanders set aside nearly forty acres of land along the Allegheny River for the King's Garden, named for the British King George III. Stretching three-quarters of a mile along the Allegheny River from Fort Pitt, the Garden included a bowling green, a fenced deer park, a large orchard, and a series of fields, pastures, and garden plots laid out in geometrical patterns. The plantings that make up the green or living walls of the café reflect the Garden's patterns.

Fort Pitt's garrison raised fruits, vegetables, and grains in the King's Garden. These local crops, rich in vitamins and nutrients, supplemented the typical military diet of salted meat, flour, dried peas, and rice. Pittsburgh's early inhabitants enjoyed strolling around the grounds for many years and continued to use the term the King's Garden even after the colonists declared their independence from King George III.
 
Erected by

The King's Garden Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, June 20, 2011
2. The King's Garden Marker
A Gift from the Employees at PNC Bank.
 
Location. 40° 26.46′ N, 80° 0.504′ W. Marker is in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in Allegheny County. Marker can be reached from Three Rivers Heritage Trail. Click for map. Located on the face of the Café at the Point near in Point State Park, coming from downtown, it sits on the left side of the walkway before the underpass to the park. Marker is in this post office area: Pittsburgh PA 15222, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Wall Section Through Rampart of Fort Pitt (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Forbes Road (about 300 feet away); Forks of the Ohio Fort Pitt Blockhouse (about 400 feet away); The Site of Fort Pitt (about 400 feet away); Edith Darlington Ammon (about 400 feet away); The Venango Path (about 500 feet away); The Forks of the Ohio (about 500 feet away); David L. Lawrence (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Pittsburgh.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Pitt gardens fed area's early settlers. Article published in Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Saturday, March 14, 2009 (Submitted on June 20, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.) 
 
Categories. AgricultureForts, CastlesWar, French and Indian
 
The King's Garden image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, June 20, 2011
3. The King's Garden
Mural etched into stainless steel facade
Café at the Point image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, June 20, 2011
4. Café at the Point
King George III image. Click for full size.
By Allan Ramsay (British Painter), circa 1761/1762
5. King George III
In coronation robes
Plan of Fort Pitt image. Click for full size.
By John Rocque, circa 1765
6. Plan of Fort Pitt
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 527 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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