Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Brandy Station in Culpeper County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Battle of Brandy Station

The Largest Cavalry Battle of the Civil War

 
 
The Restored Brandy Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 10, 2008
1. The Restored Brandy Station Marker
Inscription. Confederate horsemen numbering 9500 under the command of Gen. J.E.B. Stuart were concentrated around Brandy Station in preparation of the upcoming raid into Pennsylvania - which would culminate at Gettysburg. The Federal army, being aware of the sizable number of Confederate cavalry in this vicinity, sent Gen. Alfred Pleasonton with a force of about 8,000 cavalry and 3,000 infantry with instructions to converge on Brandy Station in two wings and attack.

About 4:30 a.m. on June 9, 1863, 5,500 Union soldiers splashed across the fog-shrouded Rappahannock River at Beverly's Ford (2 1/4 miles to your right front) surprising the Confederate outposts. Southern horsemen, awakened by the sound of gunfire, hastily rode into the fray partially dressed and often riding bareback. Confederate artillerymen settled into a formidable position here astride the Beverly's Ford Road. The 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry led an unsuccessful charge across the field to your front, although troopers reached the very muzzles of the Confederate cannon.

As Federal soldiers in this area sought another way around the insurmountable artillery line, a second Federal wing suddenly appeared in the town of Brandy Station (two miles to your left rear) and behind this Confederate position.

The Southerners began shifting forces to meet this new threat. A series
Battle of Brandy Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
2. Battle of Brandy Station Marker
The marker was damaged in 2007.
of grand mounted charges and counter-charges in classic cavalry style swept back and forth across a ridge known as Fleetwood Hill. After dispersing the threat at Brandy Station, the Confederates turned their attention again to the enemy force that had initiated the battle and launched a counterattack near Yew Ridge (two miles to your left front). The Federals were ordered to withdraw from the field just as the counterattack began.

Despite being surprised by their adversaries twice in the same day, the Confederates were able to retain the field. Union losses numbered 866, Confederate casualties were reported to be 575.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 31.293′ N, 77° 51.939′ W. Marker is in Brandy Station, Virginia, in Culpeper County. Marker is at the intersection of Beverly Ford Road (County Route 677) and St. James Church Road (County Route 676) on Beverly Ford Road. Click for map. Located next to the parking lot for the Battle of Brandy Station, St. James Church Walking Trail. Marker is in this post office area: Brandy Station VA 22714, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker
Map of the Battle of Brandy Station image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 10, 2008
3. Map of the Battle of Brandy Station
. The 1863-64 Winter Encampment (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); St. James Episcopal Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Brandy Station (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named The 1863-64 Winter Encampment (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Brandy Station (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named The Battle of Brandy Station (approx. 0.9 miles away); Where Pelham Fell (approx. 0.9 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Brandy Station (approx. one mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Brandy Station.
 
More about this marker. In the center of the marker is a map of the action described in the text.
 
Regarding Battle of Brandy Station. This is one of several markers interpreting the Battle of Brandy Station and the winter encampments of 1863-64 in Culpeper County. See the Battle of Brandy Station Virtual Tour by Markers linked below for additional related markers.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Brandy Station. National Park Service guide to the battle, including a driving tour. (Submitted on December 24, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
Marker at the Intersection of Beverly's Ford and St. James Curch Roads image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
4. Marker at the Intersection of Beverly's Ford and St. James Curch Roads
 

2. Brandy Station Foundation. Through the efforts of the Brandy Station Foundation, Civil War Preservation Trust, and other organizations, over 960 acres of this battlefield have been preserved. (Submitted on December 24, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Brandy Station. Civil War Preservation Trust classroom article on the battle. (Submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

4. Battle of Brandy Station Virtual Tour by Markers. A set markers that document the Battle of Brandy Station, June 9, 1863, and the Winter Encampment of 1863-64. Note the order of appearance is geographic and not chronologically aligned to the battle. (Submitted on January 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Across St. James Church Road from this marker a CWPT Trailhead image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
5. Across St. James Church Road from this marker a CWPT Trailhead
The Civil War Preservation Trust has setup an interpretive trail for this portion of the battlefield, which is the heart of the Brandy Station battle.
Portion of the North Battlefield of Brandy Station image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
6. Portion of the North Battlefield of Brandy Station
Looking generally west from about 500 yards north of the marker, this view is looking at the ground from which the 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry launched their charge on the Confederate artillery. On the other side of the road crossing in the middle of the frame, Confederate Gen. William "Grumble" Jones positioned his brigade to defend the Confederate left flank. Later in the day, the Federal lines stabilized along the high ground to the left of the photo frame.

In the far distance is a ridge line used by Confederate Gen. W.H.F. Lee while staging to attack Federal Gen. John Buford's Division positioned to the north.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,437 times since then and 42 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement