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Selçuk in Selçuk district, İzmir, Turkey — Aegean Region (Coastal)
 

The Basilica of St. John

 
 
The Basilica of St. John Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 22, 2011
1. The Basilica of St. John Marker
Inscription.
St. John was the youngest of the 12 Apostles of Jesus, often referred to as the “Evangelist” or “Beloved.” After the death of Jesus, the followers of Christ were subjected to persecution. St. John’s own brother, James, was the first martyr among the Apostles, having been “put to death with the sword” by King Herod Agrippa I about 42-44 A.D. (Acts 12:2). When Herod saw that this pleased his people, he sought to seize other Apostles. To avoid persecution, St. John left Jerusalem and came here, to Ephesus (then known as Asia Minor). It is believed that he brought the Virgin Mary (“Meryem” in the Koran), the mother of Jesus (“Isa” in the Koran) with him. Except for the time when St. John was exiled on the nearby island of Patmos, where he is believed to have written the Book of Revelation, he lived the remainder of his life in and around Ephesus. Upon his death in Ephesus, a memorial monument was erected over his grave at the foot of Ayasuluk Hill. Prior to the invasion by the Seldjuk Turks, the town of Selçuk was known as Ayasoluk, meaning “Devine Theologian” in honor of St. John.

In the Fourth Century, a great basilica was built over St. John’s tomb by the Roman Emperor Constantine. Later, in the Sixth Century, an even larger and more magnificent basilica
The Basilica of St. John - visitors exiting the ancient ruins via the Roman portal to the south image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 22, 2011
2. The Basilica of St. John - visitors exiting the ancient ruins via the Roman portal to the south
- the marker is located on the wall to the left.
was built over the earlier structure on orders of the Roman Emperor Justinian, who ruled from 527–565 A.D. Today, one can see the outline of both basilicas, each of which center their cruciform plan on the tomb of St. John. This Great Basilica was known as the Justinian Basilica to honor the burial place of the Apostle St. John who came to Ephesus in company with the Virgin Mary after the death of Christ. It contained six 95-foot high large cupolas that covered the main aisle. It has been determined that if fully restored it would be the seventh largest Cathedral in the world. St. John was so honored that the size of the basilica might have been larger if it were not for the limitations of the Topographical Area.

The Emperor Justinian and his wife Theodora made large financial contributions and her name was inscribed over the big capitals which crown the beautiful marble columns. An inscription was carved in the marble over his tomb which read, “This is my resting place forever, here will I dwell.” Austrian archaeologists reported that when the Tomb was opened in later centuries, it was found to contain only dust that quickly dissipated in the air. The ruins of this basilica have been thoroughly investigated by archaeologists and, commencing in 1956, have been partially restored to their original scale. This is a sacred place, and you are asked to conduct
Visitors outside the Roman portal image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 22, 2011
3. Visitors outside the Roman portal
yourself with dignity here.

The American Society of Ephesus, Inc. (Georg B. Quatman Foundation) 327 North Elizabeth Str., Lima – Ohio 45801 USA
www.societyofephesus.com

 
Erected by The American Society of Ephesus, Inc.
 
Location. 37° 57.106′ N, 27° 22.079′ E. Marker is in Selçuk, İzmir, in Selçuk district. Marker can be reached from St. Jean Caddesi west of 2013 Sokak. Click for map. Marker is on the pathway to the ruins of the basilica, just inside the main entrance gate of St. Jean Cd. Marker is in this post office area: Selçuk, İzmir 35920, Turkey.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. St. Jean'in (Aziz Yahya) Kimliği Ve Hayatı/The Life of St. John (within shouting distance of this marker); St. Jean (Aziz Yahya) Kilisesi/The Church of St. John (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); Hellenistic Fountain House (approx. 2.6 kilometers away in Izmir Province); The Great Theatre (approx. 2.6 kilometers away); The Bouleuterion (approx. 2.6 kilometers away in İzmir Province); The 'State Agora'
Ruins of the ancient basilica with the medieval fortifications on Ayasoluk Hill in the background image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 22, 2011
4. Ruins of the ancient basilica with the medieval fortifications on Ayasoluk Hill in the background
- view from the south apse toward the tomb of St. John.
(approx. 2.6 kilometers away in İzmir Province); Processional Way (approx. 2.6 kilometers away); The 'Rhodian Peristyle' and The Prytaneum (approx. 2.7 kilometers away in Izmir Province). Click for a list of all markers in Selçuk.
 
Regarding The Basilica of St. John. Selçuk was originally known as Ayios Theologos (Greek: Άγιος Θεολόγος), from which the Ottoman Turkish name Ayasluğ is derived.
 
Also see . . .
1. Basilica of St. John. Wikipedia (Submitted on June 24, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 

2. Sacred Destinations: Ephesus Basilica of St. John. (Submitted on June 24, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. St. Jean Kilisesi; Ayasuluk; Ayasoluk Hill; Temple of Artemis/Diana
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesChurches, Etc.
 
Ruins of the Temple of Artemis, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 22, 2011
5. Ruins of the Temple of Artemis, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World
- viewed from the heights of the Basilica of St. John, looking south and west. Note the lone pillar (restored using diverse fragments from the site's ruins), now a prime roost for nesting storks.
Saint John's tomb at the heart of the Basilica image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 22, 2011
6. Saint John's tomb at the heart of the Basilica
- view toward the church's east apse and its now-missing main altar.
Model showing how the "The Great" [Justinian] Basilica of St. John looked in ancient times image. Click for full size.
By Photo Creative Commons License: Yulia.
7. Model showing how the "The Great" [Justinian] Basilica of St. John looked in ancient times
<www.sacred-destinations.com/turkey/ephesus-basilica-of-st-john>
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 897 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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