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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Harpers Ferry in Jefferson County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Brown Fort

 
 
John Brown Fort Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 12, 2007
1. John Brown Fort Marker
Inscription. Here is a building with a curious past. Since its construction in 1848, it has been vandalized, dismantled, and moved four times - all because of its fame as John Brown's stronghold.

The Fort's "Movements"

1848 Built as fire-engine house for U.S. Armory.
1859 Serves as stronghold for John Brown and his raiders.
1861-1865 Escapes destruction during the Civil War (only armory building to do so), but it is vandalized by souvenir-hunting Union and Confederate soldiers and later travelers.
1891 Dismantled and transported to Chicago Exposition.
1895 Rescued from conversion to stable and brought back to Harpers Ferry area to be exhibited on a farm.
1909 Purchased by Storer College and moved to campus.
1968 Moved by National Park Service to within 150 feet of its original location.


 
Location. 39° 19.385′ N, 77° 43.766′ W. Marker is in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, in Jefferson County. Marker is at the intersection of South Potomac Street and Shenandoah Street (County Route 340/9), on the right when traveling east on South Potomac Street. Click for map. Located just west of the railroad overpass in downtown Harpers Ferry. Marker is in this post office area: Harpers Ferry WV 25425, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers
Marker at John Brown Fort image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 11, 2008
2. Marker at John Brown Fort
are within walking distance of this marker. John Brown (a few steps from this marker); A Nation's Armory (a few steps from this marker); Federal Armory (a few steps from this marker); Capture of Harpers Ferry (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Capture of Harpers Ferry (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Capture of Harpers Ferry (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Capture of Harpers Ferry (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Capture of Harpers Ferry (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Harpers Ferry.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left is a drawing of the "John Brown Raid, October 18, 1859. U.S. Marines storm the fire-engine house."

On the right side is a portrait of John Brown: "On October 16, 1859, the abolitionist John Brown and his men attacked Harpers Ferry. By the following afternoon the local militia had penned the raiders in this building at dawn on the 18th and captured Brown. Convicted of murder, treason, and inciting slaves to rebellion, he was hanged in nearby Charles Town on December 2, 1859."
 
Also see . . .  John Brown Fort. National Park Service site detailing the
John Brown Fort Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 12, 2007
3. John Brown Fort Marker
history of the building. (Submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRAfrican AmericansNotable BuildingsWar, US Civil
 
The Old Fire Engine House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 12, 2007
4. The Old Fire Engine House
The National Park Service often hosts living history displays at "John Brown's Fort."
Close-up Of Cornerstone At Fort image. Click for full size.
By Michael Stroud
5. Close-up Of Cornerstone At Fort
That this nation might have
a new birth of freedom.
That slavery should be removed
forever from American soil.
John Brown
and his 21 men gave their
lives.
To commemorate their
heroism, this tablet is
placed on this building
which has since been known
known as.
John Brown's Fort
by the
Alumni of Storer College
1918.
The Fort image. Click for full size.
By Michael Stroud
6. The Fort
Wall Stone on the Interior image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 24, 2009
7. Wall Stone on the Interior
Rebuilt on Campus 1910
Wall Stone on the Interior image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 24, 2009
8. Wall Stone on the Interior
Restored by Katefield 1895
The John Brown Fort image. Click for full size.
The Capture and Execution of John Brown: A tale of Martyrdom by Elijah Avey
9. The John Brown Fort
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,049 times since then and 43 times this year. This page was the Marker of the Week Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   6. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   7, 8. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   9. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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