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Near Brandy Station in Culpeper County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
The Battle of Brandy Station
The Struggle for Fleetwood Hill
 
The Battle of Brandy Station Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
1. The Battle of Brandy Station Marker
 
Inscription. After Col. Wyndham's assaults, Col. Judson Kilpatrick's Federal brigade crossed the Orange and Alexandria Railroad and stormed Fleetwood Hill from the southeast. The fight for Fleetwood Hill - a classic cavalry battle fought on horseback - became a lethal game of King of the Hill. Sabers clanged against sabers, cannon boomed, pistols rang out, and the choking dust made it difficult to tell "t'other from which," one Confederate recalled.

The hill changed hands several times as the battle devolved into a giant swirling melee: men from New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Maine struggled against Virginians, Georgians, Carolinians, and Mississippians.

By late afternoon, the Federals had used all their reserves. Though Brig. Gen. John Buford continued to press back the Confederates on northern Fleetwood Hill, the southern slopes were held by exhausted but triumphant Southerners. After Col. Thomas Munford's fresh Confederate brigade arrived on Buford's flank and rear, the Union commander, Brig Gen. Alfred Pleasonton, saw that further effort was fruitless and ordered his subordinates to pull back across the Rappahannock River.

In nearly 14 hours of fighting, Confederate Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart lost about 500 men killed, wounded, or captured from his total force of 9,700 soldiers; Union Gen. Pleasonton lost
 
Help Preserve Brandy Station image, Click for more information
2. Help Preserve Brandy Station
Click here for details on CWPT's efforts.
Click for more information.
 
some 900 of the 11,000 men under his command. These may seem like small numbers compared to the terrible toll paid at Gettysburg three weeks later, yet veterans remembered Brandy Station with pride as the largest and most hotly contested clash of sabers in a long and bloody war. Union cavalrymen and historians remember June 9 as the day Federal horsemen snatched the mantle of unquestioned superiority from their Confederate opponents. Most important, Robert E. Lee's infantry, poised to set out on their march north toward Gettysburg, remained undiscovered by the Federals.

Help Preserve Battlefields call CWPT at 1-888-606-1400 www.civilwar.org The Hallowell Foundation generously contributed toward the interpretation of this site in memory of Carrington Williams.
This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinion, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.
 
Erected by Civil War Preservation Trust.
 
Location. 38° 30.449′ N, 77° 52.997′ W. Marker is near Brandy Station, Virginia, in Culpeper County. Marker is on Fleetwood Heights Road
 
Fleetwood Hill Battle Map Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
3. Fleetwood Hill Battle Map
 
(County Route 685), on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Located on the Civil War Preservation Trust's Fleetwood Hill exhibition area for the Battle of Brandy Station. Marker is in this post office area: Brandy Station VA 22714, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named The Battle of Brandy Station (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Brandy Station (approx. mile away); The 1863-64 Winter Encampment (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named Battle of Brandy Station (approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Brandy Station (approx. 1.4 miles away); The 1863-64 Winter Encampment (approx. 1.4 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Brandy Station (approx. 1.5 miles away); a different marker also named The 1863-64 Winter Encampment (approx. 1.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Brandy Station.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left is "Edwin Forbes' period sketch of a cavalry charge." On the right is a map illustrating the cavalry action described in the text.
 
Regarding The Battle of Brandy Station. This is one of several markers interpreting the Battle of Brandy Station and the winter encampments of 1863-64 in Culpeper County. See the Battle of Brandy Station Virtual Tour by Markers linked below for additional related markers.
 
The Fleetwood Hill Overlook Stop Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
4. The Fleetwood Hill Overlook Stop
 

 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Brandy Station. National Park Service summary of the battle includes a driving tour. (Submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Brandy Station Foundation. Through the efforts of the Brandy Station Foundation, Civil War Preservation Trust, and other organizations, over 960 acres of this battlefield have been preserved. (Submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Battle of Brandy Station Virtual Tour by Markers. A set markers that document the Battle of Brandy Station, June 9, 1863, and the Winter Encampment of 1863-64. Note the order of appearance is geographic and not chronologically aligned to the battle. (Submitted on January 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Fleetwood Hill Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
5. Fleetwood Hill
Some modern buildings have changed the profile of Fleetwood Hill, but it is still possible to follow the action here. Col. Wyndham's command approached across the location of the markers, almost directly into the foreground from this view. Col. Kilpatrick followed Wyndham with an attack from the southeast of Fleetwood Hill (from the right of the photo) with an axis of advance aimed at the large modern house on the hill.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,280 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on March 13, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4, 5. submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
 
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