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Brandy Station in Culpeper County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
The 1863-64 Winter Encampment
The Army of the Potomac at Brandy Station
 
The 1863-64 Winter Encampment Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
1. The 1863-64 Winter Encampment Marker
 
Inscription. War has many faces and the residents of Culpeper County saw them all. Brandy Station played an important role in the Battle of Brandy Station on June 9, 1863, though the Union and Confederate armies never clashed in the streets of the little town. A few months later, however, as winter descended, roads turned to muddy soup, and the frantic place of conflict slowed, the Union army established winter camps throughout the area.

Located on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, Brandy Station served as the Union Army of the Potomac's key supply and passenger depot during their 1863-1864 winter encampment in this area. Ingalls' Station, named for the army's Quartermaster General Rufus Ingalls, was 1.2 miles to the north. About 1 mile east-northeast, along the southern slopes of Fleetwood Hill, Maj. Gen. George G. Meade, commander of the Union army, set up his headquarters.

Here in Brandy Station, amid the hubbub of loading and unloading supplies and personnel, soldiers could have their pictures taken for $1.50 or spend their money on any number of other items. As one soldier remembered, "persons of almost any trade are...making money from the soldiers. There [in Brandy Station] you will see...Oysters, Fresh Fish, Condensed Milk, and numberless other signs which tempt the pocket book of the soldier...."

"It was a very busy
 
Help Preserve Brandy Station image, Click for more information
2. Help Preserve Brandy Station
Click here for details on CWPT's efforts.
Click for more information.
 
place," another soldier wrote, "...from morning till night trains of army wagons were coming and going...waiting for their time to load."

With spring, roads dry out and temperatures rise, heralding a new season of battle. In early May 1864, the Army of the Potomac left its comfortable winter quarters and headed off to begin the bloody Overland Campaign.

Help Preserve Battlefields call CWPT at 1-888-606-1400 www.civilwar.org
The Hallowell Foundation generously contributed toward the interpretation of this site in memory of Carrington Williams.
This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinion, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.
 
Erected by Civil War Preservation Trust.
 
Location. 38° 30.167′ N, 77° 53.411′ W. Marker is in Brandy Station, Virginia, in Culpeper County. Marker is on Brandy Road. Click for map. Located in front of the "Graffiti House.". Marker is at or near this postal address: 19484 Brandy Road, Brandy Station VA 22714, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker
 
Battle of Brandy Station Driving Tour Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
3. Battle of Brandy Station Driving Tour
 
, measured as the crow flies. The Battle of Brandy Station (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named The Battle of Brandy Station (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named Battle of Brandy Station (approx. mile away); a different marker also named Battle of Brandy Station (approx. one mile away); Opening of the Gettysburg Campaign (approx. 1.3 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Brandy Station (approx. 1.9 miles away); The 1863-64 Winter Encampment (approx. 1.9 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Brandy Station (approx. 2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Brandy Station.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left of the marker is a photo of "The Army of the Potomac's commissary stores at Brandy Station during the winter of 1863-64. Looking eastward, Fleetwood Hill lies in the left distance." On the upper right is a map of the Battle of Brandy Station Driving Tour.
 
Regarding The 1863-64 Winter Encampment . This is one of several markers interpreting the Battle of Brandy Station and the winter encampments of 1863-64 in Culpeper County. See the Battle of Brandy Station Virtual Tour by Markers linked below for additional related markers.
 
Also see . . .
 
Marker is in the Parking Lot for the Graffiti House Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
4. Marker is in the Parking Lot for the Graffiti House
 

1. History of the Graffiti House. From the Brandy Station Foundation site. A link on the page details the graffiti found in the house, with several photographs. (Submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Graffiti House. (PDF) National Register for Historic Places application for the Graffiti House. Details the ownership of the house through the years, as well as a rather lengthy discussion of the graffiti found in the house. (Submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Battle of Brandy Station Virtual Tour by Markers. A set markers that document the Battle of Brandy Station, June 9, 1863, and the Winter Encampment of 1863-64. Note the order of appearance is geographic and not chronologically aligned to the battle. (Submitted on January 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
The Graffiti House Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
5. The Graffiti House
The house now serves as the Brandy Station Foundation's Visitors Center.
 
 
The Graffiti House National and State Register Plaques Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
6. The Graffiti House National and State Register Plaques
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,292 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on March 13, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
 
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