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Near Culpeper in Culpeper County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
Mount Pony Signal Station
 
Mount Pony Signal Station Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
1. Mount Pony Signal Station Marker
 
Inscription. In Aug. 1862, during the Civil War, Union Maj. Gen. John Pope established a signal station on Mount Pony, just northeast of here. On the summit of the mountain, a high scaffold was constructed out of trees for an observation post and a communication center. Because of the good visibility, "powerful glasses" were used to watch troop movements from this vantage point. Both the Federal and Confederate Signal Corps used this site during the war. Other signal stations were built by the Union army on Stony Mountain, Cedar Mountain, Thoroughfare Mountain, and Clark's Mountain.
 
Erected 2000 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number F 34.)
 
Location. 38° 26.665′ N, 78° 0.617′ W. Marker is near Culpeper, Virginia, in Culpeper County. Marker is at the intersection of James Madison Highway (U.S. 15) and Lovers Lane, on the right when traveling north on James Madison Highway. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Culpeper VA 22701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Lee and Pope (approx. 0.6 miles away); Battle of Cedar Mountain (approx. 0.6 miles away); Greenwood (approx. 0.9 miles away); Col. John Jameson (approx. 1.6 miles away); Culpeper Minute Men (approx. 1.8 miles away); a different marker also named The Culpeper Minute Men (approx. 2 miles away); Seventh Ohio Regiment (approx. 2 miles away); Second Massachusetts Infantry (approx. 2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Culpeper.
 
Mount Pony Signal Station Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
2. Mount Pony Signal Station Marker
 

 
More about this marker. This marker replaced an older marker numbered F-15 with the title "Signal Station" which read "The lone peak to the northeast, Mount Pony, was used by Pope as a signal station, 1862." The same number was duplicated for another marker titled "Stonewall Jackson's Mother" located in Loudoun County also along James Madison Highway (U.S. Highway 15).
 
Regarding Mount Pony Signal Station. This is one of several markers interpreting the Battle of Cedar Mountain. See the Battle of Cedar Mountain Virtual Tour by Markers linked below.
 
Also see . . .
1. What was a Cold War Bunker on Mount Pony..... During the Cold War, Mount Pony was one of the Continuity of Government sites. In bunkers built into the mountain, up to a billion in U.S. currency was held as a reserve to revitalize the U.S. economy in the event of a nuclear attack. (Submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. .... Is now the National Audio-Visual Archives. After the end of the Cold War made such precautions unnecessary, the bunker complex was converted to store movies and sound recordings. (Submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio-Visual Conservation. State of the art archival facility where once a wooden signal tower stood. (Submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Mount Pony Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 22, 2007
3. Mount Pony
Seen from the marker location, Mount Pony is one of several high points along the Rapidan River, which include Cedar, Clark's and Buzzard Mountains. The old bunker complex, now the Audio-Visual Archive facility, can be seen in the open ground below the crest of the mountain.
 

4. Battle of Cedar Mountain Virtual Tour by Markers. A set markers that document the Battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9, 1862, and the early phases of the Second Manassas Campaign. (Submitted on January 1, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,353 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 30, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
 
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