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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Preston in Franklin County, Idaho — The American West (Mountains)
 

Bear River Massacre

 
 
Bear River Massacre Marker image. Click for full size.
By Vincent Cascio, July 8, 2011
1. Bear River Massacre Marker
Inscription. Very few Northwestern Shoshoni survived a battle here that turned into a massacre by Col. P.E. Connorís California Volunteers.

In 1863, Conner and his force set out from salt Lake City on a cold January campaign in response to friction between the Indians and white travelers. They found more than 400 Shoshoni settled in a winter camp on Battle Creek. When Connor struck at daybreak on January 29, the Shoshoni suffered a massacre unrivaled in Western history.
 
Erected by Idaho Department of Transportation.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 42° 8.433′ N, 111° 54.65′ W. Marker is in Preston, Idaho, in Franklin County. Marker is on Highway 91 (Idaho Route 91) just south of Hot Spring Road, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Preston ID 83263, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 3 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Pioneer Ferry and Bridge (approx. 1.4 miles away); Franklin Relic Hall - 1937 (approx. 10.2 miles away); FCMI Store 1858 (approx. 10.2 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Bear River Massacre - Utah History to Go

Bear River Massacre Marker image. Click for full size.
By Vincent Cascio, July 8, 2011
2. Bear River Massacre Marker
Bear River Massacre Site has been designated a National Historic Landmark. This site possesses national significance in commemorating the history of The United States Of America. 1990 National Park Service United States Department of the Interior
. (Submitted on August 8, 2011, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Native AmericansSettlements & SettlersWars, US Indian
 
Bear River Massacre Marker image. Click for full size.
By Vincent Cascio, July 8, 2011
3. Bear River Massacre Marker
Daughter of The Utah Pioneers No 186 erected July, 1953 Pioneer Women Attacks by the Indians on the peaceful inhabitants in this vicinity led to the final battle here January 29, 1863. The conflict occurred in deep snow and bitter cold. Scores of wounded and frozen soldiers were taken from the battlefield to the Latter-day Saint community of Franklin. Here pioneer women trained through trials and necessity of frontier living, accepted the responsibility of caring for the wounded until they could be removed to Camp Douglas, Utah. Two Indian women and three children found alive after the encounter were given homes in Franklin. Franklin county.
Bear River Massacre Marker image. Click for full size.
By Vincent Cascio, July 8, 2011
4. Bear River Massacre Marker
Daughters of The Utah Pioneers No 16 erected 1932 The Battle of Bear River was fought in this vicinity January 29, 1863 Col. P.E. Connor, leading 300 California volunteers from Camp Douglas, Utah against Bannock and Shoshoni Indian guilty of hostile attacks on emigrants and settlers engaged about 500 Indians of whom 250 to 300 were killed or incapacitated, including about 90 combatant women and children. 14 soldiers were killed, 4 officers and 49 men wounded, of whom 1 officer and 7 men died later. 79 were severely frozen. Chiefs Bear Hunter, Sagwitch, and Lehi were reported killed. 175 horses and much stolen property were recovered. 70 lodges were burned. Franklin County Chapter Daughters Of the Utah Pioneers, Cache Valley Council Boy Scouts of America and Utah Pioneer Trails and Landmarks Association.
Bear River Massacre Marker image. Click for full size.
By Vincent Cascio, July 8, 2011
5. Bear River Massacre Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Vincent Cascio of Logan, Utah. This page has been viewed 1,025 times since then and 11 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Vincent Cascio of Logan, Utah. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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