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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Dalton in Whitfield County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

African-American Soldiers in Combat

 
 
African-American Soldiers in Combat Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, July 14, 2011
1. African-American Soldiers in Combat Marker
Inscription. Near Dalton on August 15, 1864, during the Civil War, the 14th United States Colored Troops (USCT), whose enlisted men were mostly former slaves, helped drive off a Confederate cavalry attack on the Western and Atlantic Railroad, U.S. General William T. Sherman's main supply line during the Atlanta Campaign. Later, on October 13, 1864, the 44th USCT was in a fort protecting the railroad through Dalton when the garrison commander surrendered to Confederate General John B. Hood. In accordance with Confederate policy, many of the 600 captured black troops were returned to slavery. Black troops rarely saw combat in Georgia, though nearly 200,000 African Americans served in the U.S. armed forces during the war.
 
Erected 2010 by Georgia Historical Society, Georgia Battlefields Association, and Georgia Department of Economic Development. (Marker Number 155-3.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 34° 46.318′ N, 84° 57.83′ W. Marker is in Dalton, Georgia, in Whitfield County. Marker is on Fort Hill Circle 0.1 miles east of North Spencer Street, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. The marker is in just off
African-American Soldiers in Combat Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, July 14, 2011
2. African-American Soldiers in Combat Marker
the traffic circle in front of the Fort Hill School. Marker is in this post office area: Dalton GA 30721, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); Western and Atlantic Railroad Depot (approx. 0.2 miles away); Joseph E. Johnston Memorial (approx. ¼ mile away); Tristam Dalton (approx. 0.3 miles away); General Cleburne’s Proposal to Arm Slaves (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Huff House (approx. 0.4 miles away); George Whitefield (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Blunt House (approx. 0.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Dalton.
 
Also see . . .
1. 14th USCT. The University of North Carolina collection on the 14th U.S. Colored Troops. (Submitted on July 17, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.) 

2. 44th USCT. Information on the 44th U.S. Colored Troops (Submitted on July 17, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansWar, US Civil
 
African-American Soldiers in Combat Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, July 14, 2011
3. African-American Soldiers in Combat Marker
Looking toward the top of the hill at Fort Hill School, built on the site of the Civil War fort.
African-American Soldiers in Combat Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, July 14, 2011
4. African-American Soldiers in Combat Marker
Looking west at the city of Dalton and Rocky Face Ridge in the distance, a major landmark in the Atlanta Campaign.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 769 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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