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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Beaver in Beaver County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort McIntosh

1778 - 1788

 
 
Fort McIntosh Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 14, 2011
1. Fort McIntosh Marker
View of the historical marker with the crest of the ridge, over-looking the Ohio River, immediately behind the historical marker.
Inscription. [Left Side of Text]: First Home of the U.S. Army

After the American Revolution was won, Congress authorized formation of a small regular army for general defense. This unit, formed under Col. Josiah Harmar, was named the first American regiment and was garrisoned at Fort McIntosh in 1784-1785, thus making this the first permanent post of the United States Army. Today's Presidential Honor Guard traces its proud origins to the Fort McIntosh garrison.

[Right Side of Text]: The Treaty of Fort McIntosh

In January 1785, 400 chiefs and warriors of the Delaware, Wyandot, Chippewa and Ottawa Indian tribes met on this site with the American Treaty Commissioners George Rogers Clark, Richard Butler and Arthur Lee, and surrendered all future claims to the lands north of the Ohio, thus making possible orderly settlement of Western Pennsylvania and all of Northwestern Ohio.
 
Location. 40° 41.457′ N, 80° 18.225′ W. Marker is in Beaver, Pennsylvania, in Beaver County. Marker is on River Road east of Market Street, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. This historical marker is located in the residential section on the south side of town, in a roadside park, along the Ohio River, between two flag poles. Marker is in this post office area: Beaver PA 15009, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Fort McIntosh Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 14, 2011
2. Fort McIntosh Marker
View of the text and the over-view of the fort that can be seen on the top of the historical marker.
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. General Lachlan McIntosh (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Fort McIntosh (a few steps from this marker); Commanding Officers (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Fort McIntosh (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Fort McIntosh (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Fort McIntosh (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Fort McIntosh (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Fort McIntosh (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Beaver.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US RevolutionaryWars, US Indian
 
Fort McIntosh Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 14, 2011
3. Fort McIntosh Marker
Close-up view of the image of Fort McIntosh, seen on the top of the historical marker.
Fort McIntosh Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 14, 2011
4. Fort McIntosh Marker
Close-up view of the text on the left side of the historical marker.
Fort McIntosh Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 14, 2011
5. Fort McIntosh Marker
Close-up view of the text on the right side of the historical marker.
Fort McIntosh Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 14, 2011
6. Fort McIntosh Marker
View of the historical marker looking southeast with the Ohio River in the background.
Fort McIntosh Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 14, 2011
7. Fort McIntosh Marker
View of the historical marker looking southwest.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 339 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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