HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
            “Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
  Home  — My Markers  — Add A Marker  — Marker Series  — Links & Books  — Forum  — About Us
Newburg in Charles County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
Crossing the Potomac
Off into the Darkness

— John Wilkes Booth – Escape of an Assassin —
 
Crossing The Potomac Civil War Trails Marker Photo, Click for full size
May 26, 2007
1. Crossing The Potomac Civil War Trails Marker
 
Inscription. After assassinating President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865, John Wilkes Booth and his accomplice, David A. Herold, fled Washington for Southern Maryland, a hotbed of Confederate sympathizers. Concealed for several days in a pine thicket two miles northeast of here, the pair made their way over rough terrain to the Potomac River on the night of April 20, 1865. Guided by Thomas A. Jones, a Confederate signal agent, they traveled about a mile to the mouth of a small stream where Jones had hidden a rowboat. Before pushing the fugitives off into the darkness, Jones recommended they follow a compass heading that would take them across the river to Mathias Point and downstream to Machodoc Creek and the home of Elizabeth Quesenberry at present-day Dahlgren, Virginia.

The pair did not reach Virginia that night; disoriented, they rowed into Nanjemoy Creek, Maryland, near John J. Hughes home. They spent the next day resting and reached Quesenberry’s on their second try. Then they continued south, crossing the Rappahannock River and hiding at the home of Richard Garrett just past Port Royal. Early in the morning of April 26, U.S. troops surrounded the barn where they were hiding. When Booth refused to surrender, Sgt. Boston Corbett shot him in the back of the neck. Soldiers pulled Booth to the farmhouse porch, where he died within a
 
Crossing The Potomac Civil War Trails Marker Photo, Click for full size
May 26, 2007
2. Crossing The Potomac Civil War Trails Marker
Virginia shoreline is visible about 2 miles across the Potomac River
 
few hours. Herold was captured, tried, convicted, and hanged on July 7 for his role in Lincoln’s assassination.
 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 23.867′ N, 76° 59.392′ W. Marker is in Newburg, Maryland, in Charles County. Marker is on Popes Creek Road 3 miles south of Crain Highway (U.S. 301), on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Newburg MD 20664, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Dents Meadow (approx. 1.1 miles away); “Cliffton” (approx. 1.8 miles away); "Huckleberry" (approx. 2 miles away); Wolleston Manor (approx. 2.3 miles away); 300 Year Old Southern Red Oak (approx. 2.3 miles away); a different marker also named Cliffton (approx. 2.4 miles away); John Wilkes Booth (approx. 2.5 miles away); Civil War Action At Mathias Point (approx. 3.1 miles away in Virginia). Click for a list of all markers in Newburg.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left is a photo of "Huckleberry, Thomas A. Jones' house," next to a portrait of Jones. In the upper center is a photo of "Dent's Meadow, on Booth's escape route to the Potomac River." On the right is a map of Booths escape route with stars to indicate Civil War Trails stops.
 
Dent's Meadow, on Booths escape route to the Potomac River Photo, Click for full size
By Allen C. Browne, September 25, 2011
3. Dent's Meadow, on Booths escape route to the Potomac River
 

 
Also see . . .
1. J. Wilkes Booth: An Account of His Sojourn in Southern Maryland. Thomas A. Jones' 1893 book. (Submitted on January 22, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 

2. Huckleberry (CH-19 ). The Maryland Inventory of Historic Properties (Submitted on January 22, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. John Wilkes Booth Escape Route
 
Huckleberry Thomas A.Jones' house Photo, Click for full size
By Allen C. Browne, September 25, 2011
4. Huckleberry Thomas A.Jones' house
 
 
Thomas A. Jones Photo, Click for full size
By Allen C. Browne, September 25, 2011
5. Thomas A. Jones
 
 
Map, John Wilkes Booth's Escape Route Photo, Click for full size
By Allen C. Browne, September 25, 2011
6. Map, John Wilkes Booth's Escape Route
 
 
Huckleberry Photo, Click for full size
By Allen C. Browne, September 25, 2011
7. Huckleberry
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on January 3, 2008. This page has been viewed 3,008 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 3, 2008.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on January 21, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
 
Recommend or Share This Page.  
Share on Tumblr


•••
More Search Options
 
Markers
Near You

 
Categories

 
States & Provinces

 
Counties
Click to List


 
Countries

Page composed
in 180 ms.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
To search within this page, hold down the Ctrl key and press F.
On an Apple computer,
hold down the Apple key and press F.