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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Charlotte in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Camp New Providence

 
 
Camp New Providence Marker image. Click for full size.
North Carolina Highway Historical Marker Program
1. Camp New Providence Marker
Inscription. Encampment, Oct.-Dec. 1780, of N.C. militia & Continental Army, where Patriots laid plans to confront Cornwallis. Site was just west of here.
 
Erected 2010 by North Carolina Office of Archives and History. (Marker Number L 110.)
 
Location. 35° 2.193′ N, 80° 46.066′ W. Marker is near Charlotte, North Carolina, in Mecklenburg County. Marker is on Providence Road (State Highway 16) south of Belicourt Drive, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Located at Six Mile Creek near the Mecklenburg/Union County line. Marker is in this post office area: Charlotte NC 28277, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Revolution in the Backcountry/ Sumter's Camp at Clems Branch (approx. 5.9 miles away in South Carolina); Springfield Plantation (approx. 9.1 miles away in South Carolina); South Carolina (approx. 9.3 miles away); Unity Presbyterian Church (approx. 9.9 miles away in South Carolina); Fort Mill Confederate Memorial (approx. 10.2 miles away in South Carolina); Women of the Confederacy Memorial
Camp New Providence Marker image. Click for full size.
North Carolina Highway Historical Marker Program
2. Camp New Providence Marker
(approx. 10.2 miles away in South Carolina); Catawba Indian Memorial (approx. 10.2 miles away in South Carolina); To the Faithful Slaves (approx. 10.2 miles away in South Carolina).
 
Regarding Camp New Providence. Site where the Continental forces and NC militia regrouped after the disastrous Battle of Camden of August, 1780. Winter Encampment with anywhere from 1,300 to 2,600 men over the period. Officers of note in the Southern Campaign who were stationed there included Horatio Gates, William Smallwood, Daniel Morgan, Otho Williams, John Eager Howard, William Washington and Thaddeus Kosciuszko. Senior officers of the Southern Department of the Continental Army met here on November 25, 1789 and developed a strategy to address Cornwallis' planned invasion of North Carolina. These plans led to the decisive American victory at the Battle of Cowpens in January, 1781.
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Tim Berly of Charlotte, North Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,073 times since then and 30 times this year. Last updated on , by Dale Buchanan of Charlotte, North Carolina. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Tim Berly of Charlotte, North Carolina.   2. submitted on , by Tim Berly of Charlotte, North Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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