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Boonsboro in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle for Fox’s Gap

“Hell is empty and all the devils are here.”

 

—Antietam Campaign 1862 —

 
The Battle for Fox’s Gap Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats
1. The Battle for Fox’s Gap Marker
Inscription. As Confederate Gen. D.H. Hill’s division struggled to hold the gaps of South Mountain on September 14, 1862, the fighting here at Fox’s Gap raged throughout the day. About 9 a.m., Gen. Jesse L. Reno’s corps attacked Confederate Gen. Samuel Garland’s lines approximately ¾ of a mile south of here and began pushing the men north towards Fox’s Gap. Sometime around midmorning, Garland fell mortally wounded and the Confederates scattered into the gap.

The fighting died down at midday as both sides delivered more men to the contest. Hill sent tow regiments of Gen. George B. Anderson's brigade to replace Garland’s scattered forces. Union Gen. Jacob D. Cox posted his regiments south of here along the edge of Daniel Wise’s field and waited for the remainder of Reno’s corps to reinforce him. As more units arrived, Hill sent Gen. Thomas F. Draytons’ and Col. George T. Anderson’s brigades along the “wood road” to attack the Federals. They formed in the Sharpsburg Road and attacked about 4 p.m.

By this time, the rest of Reno’s corps had pulled itself up onto the mountain. As Draytons’ men moved through Wise’s open field, well-aimed Union volleys struck them from behind stone walls. The Federals then counterattacked, and some Georgia troops sheltering in the sunken road soon found themselves trapped. Outnumbered four to
Close Up of Map on Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 2, 2006
2. Close Up of Map on Marker
one and suffering 51 percent casualties, Draytons’ brigade broke and fled down the mountain. Fox’s Gap was in Union hands by 5:30 p.m.
 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 28.233′ N, 77° 37.045′ W. Marker is in Boonsboro, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is at the intersection of Reno Monument Road and the Appalachian Trail, on the left when traveling west on Reno Monument Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Boonsboro MD 21713, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Deaths of Two Generals (here, next to this marker); The Maryland Campaign of 1862 (here, next to this marker); The Lost Orders (a few steps from this marker); Near Here in Wise’s Field (a few steps from this marker); Stonewall Regiment (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Boonsboro.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left a photograph is captioned, Situated on the fence-lined Old Sharpsburg Road at Fox's Gap, the Wise farm saw some of the hottest action on September 14. On the right a map of South Mountain
Markers at Fox’s Gap image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2011
3. Markers at Fox’s Gap
There are two Civil War Trails markers at this location. The Battle for Fox’s Gap marker is seen here on the left.
indicates the areas involved with the battle. Other Civil War Trails sites are indicated with a red star.
 
Also see . . .
1. A Gap in Time: The Wise Farmstead/Fox Gap Archaeological Project. (Submitted on July 23, 2006.)
2. The Battle of South Mountain — Fox's Gap. Page on The Central Maryland Heritage League Land Trust's web site. (Submitted on July 23, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Five Markers Grouped Together image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 2, 2006
4. Five Markers Grouped Together
This marker is the left-most marker. The Reno monument is out-of-frame to the left. The pavement you see is the Appalachian Trail, which at this point runs on a narrow roadway used to reach the North Carolina South Mountain Monument.
The Battle for Fox’s Gap Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 24, 2009
5. The Battle for Fox’s Gap Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,712 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   5. submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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