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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Madison in Dane County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Plough Inn

1853, 1858

 
 
Plough Inn Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, August 2, 2011
1. Plough Inn Marker
Inscription. Originally constructed as the stone house of German immigrant August Paunack, the structure was converted to an inn in 1858. It was extended toward the road by a twenty-five foot brick addition in the Greek Revival vernacular. Owned by Englishman John Whare during this period, it stood on Wiota Road offering sustenance and shelter to travelers to and from the southwestern part of the state.
 
Erected 1975 by the Madison Landmarks Commission. (Marker Number 41.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Wisconsin, Madison Landmarks Commission marker series.
 
Location. 43° 3.203′ N, 89° 26.096′ W. Marker is in Madison, Wisconsin, in Dane County. Marker is at the intersection of Monroe Street and Copeland Street, on the right when traveling south on Monroe Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3402 Monroe Street, Madison WI 53711, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Plough Inn (here, next to this marker); Glenwood Children's Park (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Old Spring Hotel (approx. mile away); Old Spring Tavern
Plough Inn Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, August 2, 2011
2. Plough Inn Marker
The marker is on the corner of the front of the inn, just to the left of center in this photograph.
(approx. mile away); John M. Olin (approx. 0.4 miles away); Jacobs House I (approx. half a mile away); Nakoma (approx. half a mile away); In Memory of Our Beloved Sons (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Madison.
 
Regarding Plough Inn. According to the Madison Landmarks Commission, "The original structure on this site was a stone house built for German immigrants Frederick and Amelia Paunack. Mr. Paunack was a stonecutter and probably cut the sandstone for his house from the nearby quarry that is now Glenwood Children's Park [see the nearby marker]. In 1858 a larger two-story brick section was added in front of the small house. The bricks came from a brickyard near the Old Spring Tavern [see the nearby marker] on Nakoma Road. The front section is in the vernacular Greek Revival style. The stone and brick were covered with stucco in the early 20th century. The Plough Inn, established by John and Isabella Whare about the time the brick section was built, served as a road house for people traveling to and from the southwestern parts of Wisconsin, including Monroe (hence, Monroe Street) and Wiota (hence nearby Wyota
Plough Inn Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, August 2, 2011
3. Plough Inn Marker
The marker is on the corner on the left front of the inn, just to the right of the sign for the current occupant, the Arbor House, an environmental inn.
Ave.). The Plough Inn was a favorite jaunt for soldiers living at Camp Randall during the Civil War and continued to be used as a tavern into the 20th century."
 
Also see . . .
1. Madison Landmarks Commission. The landmark nomination form for the house. (Submitted on August 3, 2011, by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.) 

2. Plough Inn History. From the current occupant, the Arbor House, an environmental inn. (Submitted on August 3, 2011, by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.) 
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsSettlements & Settlers
 
Plough Inn image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, August 2, 2011
4. Plough Inn
This is a view of the inn from Copeland Street.
Plough Inn image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, August 2, 2011
5. Plough Inn
This is the back of the inn.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 406 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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