“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Snow Camp in Alamance County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)

Cane Creek Meeting House

Suffering for Peace

Cane Creek Meeting House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dave Twamley, July 4, 2011
1. Cane Creek Meeting House Marker
Inscription. The Quakers (Society of Friends) were early anti-slavery supporters of the Underground Railroad. Once the war erupted and Alamance County residents chose sides, supporters of the Confederacy regarded the Friends as Unionists. Never attacked directly by their neighbors, the Quakers were subjected to various pressures to conform. The government, attempting to enforce the conscription acts, tried not only to persuade Quaker conscripts to renounce their faith but also inflicted physical and psychological violence on them.

Solomon Frazier, of neighboring Randolph County, endured an experience suffered by many others. Early in the war, Frazier paid a $500 fine to avoid conscription. By 1864, however, when Confederate manpower needs were acute, he was arrested and taken to the prison at Salisbury. There, despite being beaten to make him renounce his beliefs, he refused on religious grounds to “take up the gun” or to serve as a prison guard. When the officer in charge became furious with him, Frazier said “If it is thy duty to inflict this punishment on me, do it cheerfully; donít get angry about it.” When rifle barrels were leveled at his face, Frazier calmly said, “It is the Sabbath and as good a day to die as any.” Never broken, he survived this mistreatment and the war.

William Thompson,
Cane Creek Meeting House image. Click for full size.
By Dave Twamley, July 4, 2011
2. Cane Creek Meeting House
conscripted from this Meeting (congregation), was killed at Gettysburg, leaving a wife, Martha, and small children. At least seven Confederate veterans are buried in the cemetery a mile west, a silent tribute to the Friendsí spirit of forgiveness of those who did take up the gun.

As a minister for this Meeting, Isham Cox became the spokes man for the Quaker community to surrounding faiths. His membership on the Yearly Meetingís Committee on Suffering led him to seek better treatment for Solomon Frazierís during Frazierís confinement. Cox succeeded because of his prestige with the North Carolina government, and finally secured Frazierís release.
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
Location. 35° 53.113′ N, 79° 26.154′ W. Marker is in Snow Camp, North Carolina, in Alamance County. Marker is on Drama Road, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Located in the parking lot of the Snow Camp Outdoor Theater. Marker is at or near this postal address: 301 Drama Road, Snow Camp NC 27349, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Freedom Hill Church (within shouting distance
Marker Location Map image. Click for full size.
By Dave Twamley, July 4, 2011
3. Marker Location Map
of this marker); Micajah McPherson (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Snow Camp (approx. half a mile away); Cane Creek Meeting (approx. 0.6 miles away); Cane Creek Friends Meeting Since 1751 / Abigail Overman Pike 1709 - 1781 (approx. 0.6 miles away); A Memorial to British Troops Who Died in the Old Meeting House (approx. 0.6 miles away); Allen House (approx. 1.2 miles away); Early Railroads (approx. 4.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Snow Camp.
Categories. War, US Civil
Snow Camp Outdoor Theater Parking Lot image. Click for full size.
By Dave Twamley, July 4, 2011
4. Snow Camp Outdoor Theater Parking Lot
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dave Twamley of Durham, North Carolina. This page has been viewed 809 times since then and 111 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Dave Twamley of Durham, North Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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