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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Auburn in Fauquier County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Grapewood Farm Engagement

 
 
Grapewood Farm Engagement Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 5, 2008
1. Grapewood Farm Engagement Marker
Inscription. Pursued by Union detachments after raiding a train north of Catlett Station on 30 May 1863, Confederate Col. John S. Mosby and 50 of his Rangers (43rd Battalion Virginia Cavalry) made a stand on a hill just to the north. The Rangers used a howitzer to break a charge by the 5th New York Cavalry. The New Yorkers regrouped, however, and with troopers of the 1st Vermont and the 7th Michigan overran Mosby's position. After a hand-to-hand struggle, Mosby and the Rangers fled, abandoning the cannon and losing some 20 men wounded and killed. Among the dead was Capt. Bradford Smith Hoskins, an English professional soldier, who was buried at nearby Greenwich Presbyterian Church. Union losses were 15 killed and 4 wounded.
 
Erected 1994 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number G 21.)
 
Location. 38° 44.144′ N, 77° 41.032′ W. Marker is in Auburn, Virginia, in Fauquier County. Marker is at the intersection of Rogues Road (County Route 602) and Grapewood Drive (Local Route 1521), on the right when traveling west on Rogues Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Warrenton VA 20187, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Greenwich (approx. 2.2
Grapewood Farm Engagement Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 5, 2008
2. Grapewood Farm Engagement Marker
miles away); Stony Lonesome Farm (approx. 2.2 miles away); a different marker also named “Greenwich” (approx. 2.2 miles away); Neavil's Ordinary (approx. 2.3 miles away); Neavilís Mill (approx. 2.4 miles away); Battle of Coffee Hill (Second Battle of Auburn) (approx. 2.5 miles away); Second Manassas Campaign (approx. 2.8 miles away); Stuart's Bivouac (approx. 3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Auburn.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Mosby Gun. The gun captured here eventually found its way to the 45th Infantry Division Museum in Oklahoma City, OK. If the weapon could talk, it would indeed have an interesting story to tell. (Submitted on January 6, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Vint Hill Farms History. Slightly off topic, but the nearby Vint Hill Farms has at least one building that may date to the time of the Civil War. Graves of unknown Federal solders are also within the grounds. Skirmishes like that at Grapewood Farm were common throughout this area of Prince William and Fauquier Counties during
Mosby's Hasty Defense image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 5, 2008
3. Mosby's Hasty Defense
On the high ground just short of the old Vint Hill Farm military base entrance, Mosby chose to turn on his pursuers and challenge them with his cannon. The smokestacks in the distance are those of the power plant for the old base complex.
the war. (Submitted on January 6, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Mosbyís Raid at Catlettís Station. Several markers trace the raid and the subsequent pursuit. The grave of Bradford Smith Hoskins mentioned on this marker is pictured on the Greenwich marker page. (Submitted on January 6, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Mosby's High Ground image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 5, 2008
4. Mosby's High Ground
Further down the road from the previous photo, near the site of Mosby's defense. The actual site cannot be pinpointed with certainty, as the farm lanes have shifted as they evolved into county routes.
Vint Hill Farms image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 5, 2008
5. Vint Hill Farms
A location calling for a marker or at least better interpretation is the site of the old Army base at Vint Hill Farms. Initially established during World War II, the base was used at that time to intercept and monitor radio communications between Germany and Japan. During the Cold War the site was similarly used to monitor radio transmissions, to include those by spies operating within the United States. Intelligence information interpreted here found its way to decision makers in the Pentagon.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,378 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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