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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oxon Hill in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Hanson

 
 
John Hanson Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, December 1, 2004
1. John Hanson Marker
Inscription.
President of the United States
in Congress Assembled, 1781-2,
died November 15, 1783, at
“Oxon Hill”
1½ miles west of here.
The original mansion house, built
by the Addison family, was burned
February 6, 1895.

 
Erected 1967 by State Roads Commission.
 
Location. 38° 48.187′ N, 76° 59.596′ W. Marker is in Oxon Hill, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on Oxon Hill Road (Maryland Route 414) 0.3 miles east of Indian Head Highway (Maryland Route 210), on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Oxon Hill MD 20745, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. War All Around (approx. 0.6 miles away); Oxon Cove Park and Oxon Hill Farm (approx. 0.6 miles away); "Salubria" (approx. 0.7 miles away); A Farm for St. Elizabeths, 1891-1950 (approx. 0.7 miles away); Sweet Sorghum (approx. ¾ mile away); Two Centuries of Farm Buildings (approx. ¾ mile away); Why a Brick Stable? (approx. 0.8 miles away); Root Cellar (approx. 0.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Oxon Hill.
 
More about this marker. The marker and
John Hanson - Oxon Hill marker with marquee for the adjacent "John Hanson Montessori School" image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, October 2007
2. John Hanson - Oxon Hill marker with marquee for the adjacent "John Hanson Montessori School"
its pole were leaning over, as if struck by a car, in 2004. It was standing tall again in 2007.
 
Regarding John Hanson. John Hanson was born in Port Tobacco, Maryland on April, 14, 1715, the namesake of his grandfather who came to Maryland from England as an indentured servant. He followed the family tradition as a planter, extending and improving his holdings.

He was the third of ten men to serve, under the Articles of Confederation, in the ill-defined office of “President of the United States in Congress Assembled.” None functioned as “commander-in-chief” (George Washington continued in this capacity until after the Revolutionary War ended) nor did any exercise much other executive power during their one year terms of office, where they presided over the Congress of Confederation.

As “President of the United States in Congress Assembled,” Hanson was the first to serve a full one-year term, the first elected by the 13 Original States' Delegates serving under the Articles of Confederation, and the first chosen to the office after the British surrender at Yorktown. Tradition also holds that Hanson was the first “President” to use that title in its executive connotation and to be recognized internationally as the national government’s “head of state.” Even then,
Oxon Hill Manor, <i>the great manor house</i>, constructed 1928 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, October 2007
3. Oxon Hill Manor, the great manor house, constructed 1928
President Hanson’s gravesite has been lost, but is presumed to rest somewhere nearby.
he considered himself a successor to the first two men to hold the office. He remains the only Marylander to have ever held this title.

Hanson’s grave site has been lost, but he is presumed to rest somewhere near the great manor house constructed in 1928 by Sumner Welles (U.S. Undersecretary of State, 1933-42) on the grounds of what had been Thomas Addison’s huge tobacco plantation (approximately 14,000 acres, overlooking the Potomac River and operating with some 71 slaves around the time of Hanson’s last visit), “Oxon Hill.”
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. John Hanson. (Submitted on March 15, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. John Hanson myths. (Submitted on March 15, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Notable PersonsPatriots & PatriotismPoliticsWar, US Revolutionary
 
Portrait of John Hanson image. Click for more information.
4. Portrait of John Hanson
Portrait is by John Hesselius, c 1765 (Image Source: Wikipedia)
Click for more information.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 7,102 times since then and 16 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on , by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.   2. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   4. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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