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Hatteras in Dare County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Fort Clark/The Bombardment of Fort Hatteras

 
 
Fort Clark Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, August 16, 2011
1. Fort Clark Marker
Inscription.
Side A:
Fort Clark
Hatteras Inlet, defended by Forts Clark and Hatteras, was a strategic port of entry for troops and supplies providing deep water access to the vital intercoastal waterways. In later May of 1881, the Federal Blockade Board of Strategy began implementing General Winfield Scott's "Anaconda Plan" intending to constrict the South's warfare capability. Initially, they regarded the "...sterile, half drowned shores of North Carolina" as unimportant; less than one month later, they acknowledged this same coast as being "...the most dangerous stretch of shore in the whole Confederacy." All along the coast, lighthouses were "blacked out," channel buoys were sunk, and forts were constructed to defend navigable inlets.

Side B:
The Bombardment of Fort Hatteras
After North Carolina joined the Confederacy, Hatteras became a principal port of privateering. With Cape Hatteras Lighthouse serving as a lookout tower, privateers freely passed through Hatteras Inlet taking dozens of ships and millions of dollars in cargo. Once more, the distinction between pirating and privateering became vague and depended upon the allegiance of the individual. Northern losses were so great, the nation's largest maritime insurance companies demanded the destruction of the "nest
The Bombardment of Fort Hatteras Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, August 16, 2011
2. The Bombardment of Fort Hatteras Marker
of pirates" and smugglers at Hatteras. In response to corporate and public outcry, and in desperate need of an easy victory, the first joint military operation of the war was authorized by the United States Navy. Hatteras and its defenses fell on August 29, 1861 after two days of naval bombardment.
 
Location. 35° 12.354′ N, 75° 42.341′ W. Marker is in Hatteras, North Carolina, in Dare County. Marker can be reached from Museum Drive 0.2 miles west of Coast Guard Road. Click for map. Located in parking lot of Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum. Part of the Hatteras Village Guided Tour. Marker is in this post office area: Hatteras NC 27943, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Burnside's Expedition Crossing Hatteras Bar/The Burnside Expedition at Hatteras Inlet (a few steps from this marker); Maritime Casualties of the American Civil War/Loss of the USS Monitor (within shouting distance of this marker); Flagship USS Minnesota/Hotel de Afrique (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Confederate Forts (approx. mile away); America's 1st Attempt at Civil War Reunification (approx. 1.3 miles away); Mitchell Demonstrates Air Power
Fort Clark Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, August 16, 2011
3. Fort Clark Marker
(approx. 5 miles away); Paukenschlag (approx. 10.2 miles away); Life at the Light (approx. 10.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Hatteras.
 
Categories. War, US CivilWaterways & Vessels
 
The Bombardment of Fort Hatteras Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, August 16, 2011
4. The Bombardment of Fort Hatteras Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 663 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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