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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Springfield in Washington County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Lincoln Cabin

 
 
The Lincoln Cabin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, August 17, 2011
1. The Lincoln Cabin Marker
Inscription. The Lincoln Cabin is a replica of the cabin in which President Abraham Lincolnís grandmother Bersheba Lincoln, lived and raised her children after the death of her husband, Abraham.

In the spring of 1786, Abraham and Bersheba Lincoln were living on a farm overlooking Long Run in Jefferson County. Abraham and his sons, Mordecai, Thomas and Josiah, were planting corn when they were attacked by Indians. Mordecai killed one of the attackers but not before Abraham was mortally wounded. Bersheba moved her sons and daughters, Mary and Nancy, to a house on this site shortly alter Abrahamís death.

Thomas Lincoln, father of the President, lived in the house until he was twenty-five years old. A cabinet maker, Thomas made the corner cupboard now displayed in the Lincoln Cabin.

The Washington County Historical Society purchased the site of Bersheba Lincolnís cabin in 1933. After careful research, the Lincoln Cabin was built on the site of the original house.

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Kentucky Lincoln Heritage Trail

1809 Abraham Lincoln born at Sinking Spring farm, in present-day Larue County, Kentucky.
1816 Lincoln family moved from Kentucky.
1841 Abraham Lincoln visited his friend Joshua Speed at Farmington, the Speed family plantation, in Louisville,
The Lincoln Cabin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, August 17, 2011
2. The Lincoln Cabin Marker
Kentucky.
1842 Abraham Lincoln married Mary Todd of Lexington, Kentucky.
1847 The Lincoln family visited Lexington, Kentucky, en route to Abrahamís only term in Congress.
1860 Abraham Lincoln elected President of the United States in November.
1865 Abraham Lincoln assassinated at Fordís Theatre in Washington, D.C.

www.kylincolntrail.com www.heritage.ky.gov www.kylincolntrail.org www.history.ky.gov www.transportation.ky.gov
A project of the Kentucky Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission produced by the Kentucky Heritage Council in partnership with the Kentucky Historical Society and the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet

 
Erected by Kentucky Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission.
 
Location. 37° 45.651′ N, 85° 12.894′ W. Marker is near Springfield, Kentucky, in Washington County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Beechland Road (Kentucky Route 438) and Lincoln Park Road (Kentucky Route 528), on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Located in Lincoln Homestead State Park‎. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5079 Lincoln Park Road, Springfield KY 40069, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Berry Cabin (here, next
The Lincoln Cabin (replica) image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, August 17, 2011
3. The Lincoln Cabin (replica)
to this marker); The Lincolns Move West (a few steps from this marker); The Nancy Hanks Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Nancy Hanks and Thomas Lincoln (a few steps from this marker); The Marriage of Nancy & Thomas Lincoln (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Lincoln Cabin (within shouting distance of this marker); Lincoln Homestead State Park (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Lincoln Homestead State Park (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Springfield.
 
More about this marker. On the lower right: This illustration, titled “The killing of Abraham Lincoln, the Pioneer, 1786,” appeared in The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine in November 1886. Drawn by Henry Farny and engraved by J. H. E. Whitney, the illustration is rendered in the dramatic style popular at the time.
 
Also see . . .
1. Lincoln Homestead State Park‎. Kentucky State Parks
Abraham Lincoln image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
4. Abraham Lincoln
This 1887 portrait of Abraham Lincoln by George P. A. Healy hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC.

“Today Abraham Lincoln is universally regarded as one of our greatest presidents. But from the start of his administration, Lincoln, guiding the nation in a time of civil war, was beset with criticism from all sides. Some charged him with moral cowardice for initially insisting that an end to slavery was not one of his wartime goals; others accused him of overstepping his constitutional powers; still others blamed him for military reverses in the field. But as Union forces moved toward victory, Lincoln's eloquent articulation of the nation's ideals and his eventual call for an end to slavery gradually invested him with grandeur. following his assassination in 1865, that grandeur beca.me virtually unassailable.

The original version of this portrait was a template for artist George P. A. Healy's large painting The Peacemakers, depicting Lincoln in consultation with three of his main military advisers at the end of the Civil War. But Healy recognized that this made a fine portrait in its own right and eventually made three replicas, including this one.” — National Portrait Gallery
(Submitted on August 21, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

2. Kentucky Lincoln Heritage Trail. (Submitted on August 21, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 390 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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