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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Dupont in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort DuPont

Civil War Defenses of Washington

 

1861 - 1865

 
Fort DuPont Marker, close-up of Panel 1 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 23, 2011
1. Fort DuPont Marker, close-up of Panel 1
Inscription.
Panel 1:
Civil War Defenses of Washington
Fort DuPont

This small work was one of the defenses begun in the fall of 1861 on the ridge east of the Anacostia River. It was named after Admiral Samuel DuPont, a commander of the South Atlantic Blockade Squadron. Eight guns and one mortar comprised its armament.

United States Department of the Interior, National Park Service, National Capital Parks - Presented by the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the District of Columbia, 1955


Panel 2:
... Earthworks of Fort DuPont are visible; follow path to the entrance of the park. ...
[Rendering of] Fort DuPont from a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers drawing.
Fort DuPont was named after Rear Admiral Francis Pierpoint DuPont, a Union naval hero of the early years of the Civil War.
[Map of] Other Civil War fort locations administered by the National Park Service.

During the Civil War, Washington's forts overlooked farm land. [Background photograph of Union artillerymen at unidentified site in the Civil War Defenses of Washington.]

 
Erected 1955 by National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the District of Columbia and the National Park Service.
 
Marker series.
Fort DuPont Marker Panel 1 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 23, 2011
2. Fort DuPont Marker Panel 1
This marker is included in the Defenses of Washington, and the National Society of Colonial Dames of America marker series.
 
Location. 38° 52.389′ N, 76° 56.428′ W. Marker is in Fort Dupont, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from Alabama Avenue, NE east of Massachusetts Avenue, NE. Click for map. Two blocks from the Maryland state line, the marker panels are in the woods near the "Fort Circle" urban gardening/picnic area in the southeast section of Fort DuPont Park - at the north end of the one-way vehicle loop off Alabama Avenue, NE. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20019, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Original Federal Boundary Stone SE 2 (approx. 0.3 miles away); Fort Davis (approx. 0.7 miles away); Original Federal Boundary Stone SE 3 (approx. 0.9 miles away); Woodlawn Cemetery (approx. 0.9 miles away); Fort Chaplin (approx. one mile away); Original Federal Boundary Stone SE 1 (approx. 1.2 miles away); Fort Mahan (approx. 1.4 miles away); Seafarers Yacht Club (approx. 1.9 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. RAdm Samuel Francis DuPont. (Submitted on August 23, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Fort Dupont Park: History and Culture. ... Runaway slaves found safety here
Fort DuPont Marker Panel 2 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 23, 2011
3. Fort DuPont Marker Panel 2
before moving on to join the growing community of "contrabands" in Washington.... (Submitted on August 23, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. MilitaryNotable PlacesWar, US Civil
 
RAdm. Samuel Francis DuPont image. Click for full size.
By Frederick Gundstaf, 1862
4. RAdm. Samuel Francis DuPont
Fort DuPont Marker Panels, Fort DuPont Park image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 23, 2011
5. Fort DuPont Marker Panels, Fort DuPont Park
Entrance to "Fort Circle Park" picnic area, southeast section of Fort DuPont Park image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 23, 2011
6. Entrance to "Fort Circle Park" picnic area, southeast section of Fort DuPont Park
- earth works and marker panels are at far end of the one-way loop trail off
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 678 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on March 4, 2017.
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