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Anacostia in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Stanton

Civil War Defenses of Washington

 

—1861 – 1865 —

 
Fort Stanton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 28, 2011
1. Fort Stanton Marker
Inscription.
Earthworks of Fort Stanton are visible in the wooded area 200 yards in front of you.

Diagram:
Fort Stanton from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers drawing.

Fort Stanton was named for Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, was the first fort constructed beyond the Anacostia River.

Map:
Other Civil War fort locations administered by the National Park Service.

Period photograph of artillerists at an unspecified battery belonging to the Civil War Defenses of Washington: During the Civil War, Washington’s forts overlooked farm land.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 51.491′ N, 76° 58.977′ W. Marker is in Anacostia, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from Morris Road, SE north of Morris Rd/Elvans Street, SE. Click for map. Marker is south of the Fort Stanton works in a cleared field shown on road maps as the Wilkinson Recreation Center - off the northwest corner of the west parking lot for Our Lady of Perpetual Help Catholic Church. It is accessible via the church's driveway which is identified as "private property". Marker is at or near this postal address: 1600/1604 Morris Rd., SE, Washington DC 20020, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Fort Stanton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 28, 2011
2. Fort Stanton Marker
- with the remains of the fort's earthworks hidden by the trees beyond the grassy field.
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Thurgood Marshall (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Growlery (approx. 0.3 miles away); Frederick Douglass National Historic Site (approx. 0.4 miles away); Battery Ricketts (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Sage of Anacostia (approx. 0.4 miles away); Uniontown, DC's First Suburb (approx. half a mile away); Mother Churches and Their Daughters (approx. half a mile away); Crossing Lines (approx. 0.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Anacostia.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Stanton, Washington, DC. ... Not all the land that made up the site of Fort Stanton was converted to public park land. In 1920, local African-American Catholics constructed Our Lady of Perpetual Help church on land formerly owned by Dr. J.C. Norwood, a local physician. After the remaining grounds of the fort were purchased in 1925, nearby residents reportedly "walked family cows to Fort Stanton Park to graze before the school bell rang." Today, the church still stands adjacent to the grounds of the park. The Washington D.C. Department of Parks and National Parks Service jointly manage the 67 acres of park land that stand on the site of the fort today. D.C. authorities manage approximately 11 acres that contain a recreation center and ball fields, while the National Parks Service manages the remaining acreage,
Fort Stanton Marker, at right, viewed from the church parking lot image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 28, 2011
3. Fort Stanton Marker, at right, viewed from the church parking lot
with downtown Washington, DC (note the Washington Monument at left) in the background across the Anacostia River.
which is mostly wooded and contains the remains of forts Stanton and Ricketts. The area also is site to the Anacostia Museum, a Smithsonian Institution facility devoted to the history of African-Americans. ... (Submitted on August 29, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 

2. Mr. Lincoln's White House: Edwin M. Stanton. (Submitted on August 29, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
3. Contraband: Former Slaves in the Capital during and after the Civil War. (Submitted on August 29, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church; Fort Stanton, Anacostia.
 
Categories. African AmericansForts, CastlesNotable PlacesWar, US Civil
 
Edwin McMasters Stanton image. Click for full size.
1860s
4. Edwin McMasters Stanton
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 767 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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