Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Philadelphia in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Germantown White House

Deshler-Morris House

 

—Independence Nat’l Hist Park —

 
The Germantown White House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 3, 2011
1. The Germantown White House Marker
Inscription.
President George Washington lived here in the Deshler-Morris House twice. He came here first seeking refuge from the yellow fever epidemic of 1793. The “pure and healthy air” of the rural village of Germantown, six miles from Philadelphia, was safe from the disease. More than 4,000 Philadelphians died as the disease ravaged the national capital. Thousands of residents left the city for the comparatively disease-free countryside. The following summer Washington returned with his family, who had now joined him in Philadelphia. This house thus became the first of many summer presidential retreats. Here the elder Washingtons relaxed with their grandchildren, Eleanor Parke Custis and George Washington Parke Custis, and enjoyed the pleasures of family life. The household was served by enslaved persons and servants, both hired and indentured.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 40° 2.035′ N, 75° 10.328′ W. Marker is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia County. Marker is on Germantown Avenue, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5442 Germantown Avenue, Philadelphia PA 19144, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance
The Germantown White House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 3, 2011
2. The Germantown White House Marker
of this marker. A different marker also named The Germantown White House (a few steps from this marker); Soldiers Monument at Germantown (within shouting distance of this marker); Reformed Church of Germantown (within shouting distance of this marker); Market Square (within shouting distance of this marker); Louisa May Alcott (within shouting distance of this marker); Delplaine House (within shouting distance of this marker); Christopher Saur (approx. 0.2 miles away); Christopher Sower (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Philadelphia.
 
More about this marker. The background of the marker contains a picture of President and Mrs. Washington at home with their grandchildren as a servant looks on. An interior picture of the Germantown White House appears at the lower left of the marker. It contains a caption of “President Washington met with his cabinet here in November 1793 to resolve domestic and foreign crises that threatened the new nation.”
 
Also see . . .  Deshler-Morris House. Historic Germantown website. (Submitted on September 5, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
Marker on Germantown Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 3, 2011
3. Marker on Germantown Avenue
Identical Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 3, 2011
4. Identical Marker
An identical Germantown White House marker is located at the north end of the house.
The Germantown White House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 3, 2011
5. The Germantown White House
Both Germantown White House markers can be seen in this photo on either side of the house.
Rear Side of the Germantown White House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 4, 2014
6. Rear Side of the Germantown White House
This is the only building where Washington worked as president that is still standing.
President Washington's Office image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 4, 2014
7. President Washington's Office
The Germantown White House Dining Room image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 4, 2014
8. The Germantown White House Dining Room
President Washington took his meals and met with his cabinet in this room. Among those who were here included Sec. of War Henry Knox, Attorney General Edmund Randolph, and Sec. of State Thomas Jefferson.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 335 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement