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Foggy Bottom in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The American Meridian

 
 
American Meridian Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 4, 2011
1. American Meridian Marker
Inscription.
To your left is the hemisphere of the Atlantic, the hemisphere of Europe and Africa, of Roman numerals and Indian script, of the Silk Road and the rising sun.

To your right is the hemisphere of the Pacific and the American West, the hemisphere of Japan and China, of calligraphy and rocketry, of towering volcanoes and the starry night.

Beneath your feet is the line that divides the two.

From 1848 to 1884, the United States of America marked the center of its world at this line. Before it accepted the Meridian at Greenwich, England, as the “Prime Meridian,” the United States separated the world into eastern and western hemispheres along the American Meridian, a line that originated at the old U.S. Naval Observatory and passed through this point.

This Meridian was used to survey the western states, and the straight borders of those states are measured in integral degrees from this point.
Wyoming Eastern Border: 29 Degrees (Am.) West
Western Border: 36 Degrees (Am.) West
Colorado Eastern Border:27 Degrees (Am.) West
Western Border: 34 Degrees (Am.) West
Oregon Eastern Border: 42 Degrees (Am.) West

Also borders of Arizona, California, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North and South Dakota, Utah, and Washington.
The
George
Washington
University
Washington,
American Meridian - delineated by the grey line on the sidewalk under the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 4, 2011
2. American Meridian - delineated by the grey line on the sidewalk under the Marker
DC

Stephen Joel Trachtenberg
President
June 2000
Meridian
American Eastern Hemisphere + American Western Hemisphere

 
Erected 2000 by The George Washington University.
 
Location. 38° 53.97′ N, 77° 3.08′ W. Marker is in Foggy Bottom, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of 24th Street, NW and H Street, NW, on the left when traveling south on 24th Street, NW. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2310 H Street, NW, Washington DC 20037, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. St. Mary’s Episcopal Church (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Benito Juárez Memorial (about 700 feet away); Leonard A. Grimes (about 700 feet away); Aleksandr Pushkin (about 800 feet away); Pembroke College, Oxford, Coat of Arms (approx. 0.2 miles away); Ingrid Bergman (approx. ¼ mile away); GW's River Horse (approx. ¼ mile away); Marquis de Lafayette Hall (approx. ¼ mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Foggy Bottom.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .  Washington Meridian
American Meridian Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 4, 2011
3. American Meridian Marker
. Wikipedia...Old Naval Observatory Meridian (Submitted on September 5, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. geography; cartography; navigation
 
Categories. PoliticsScience & Medicine
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 603 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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