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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Richmond, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Tyler

 
 
John Tyler Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., January 3, 2008
1. John Tyler Marker
Inscription.
State Legislator, U.S. Congressman
Governor of Virginia,
U.S. Senator, Vice President of U.S.,
Peace Commissioner,
Confederate Congressman and
tenth President of the United States

This marker was placed in 1949 by
the Head Camp Jurisdiction of Virginia

Woodmen of the World

 
Erected 1949 by Head Camp Jurisdiction of Virginia, Woodmen of the World.
 
Location. 37° 32.334′ N, 77° 25.971′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Virginia. Click for map. Marker is located in Capitol Square. Marker is in this post office area: Richmond VA 23219, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Virginia Civil Rights Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Virginia’s Executive Mansion (within shouting distance of this marker); The Executive Mansion of Virginia (within shouting distance of this marker); Hunter Holmes McGuire, M.D. (within shouting distance of this marker); Thomas J. Jackson, General CSA (within shouting distance of this marker); William Smith (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Governor Edmund Randolph (about 300 feet away); Freedmen's Bureau Freedman's Bank (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Richmond.
 
Categories. Fraternal or Sororal OrganizationsNotable Persons
 
John Tyler Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., January 3, 2008
2. John Tyler Marker
John Tyler Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., January 3, 2008
3. John Tyler Marker
John Tyler image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
4. John Tyler
This 1859 portrait of John Tyler by George P. A. Healy hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“In rallying to the cry of ‘Tippecanoe and Tyler, too’ in 1840, voters had their eyes fixed on the Whig Party's White House contender referred to in the first half of that catchy slogan William Henry Harrison, hero of the Battle of Tippecanoe. For most, his vice-presidential running mate, John Tyler, represented merely an afterthought. Within a month of his inauguration, however, Harrison was dead, and Tyler became the first vice president to be made president upon the death of his predecessor.

Tyler claimed the full powers of the presidency on taking office and thereby set a valuable precedent for future vice presidents who faced his situation. But Tyler's White House tenure was tempestuous. When his belief in the limited powers of federal government led him to veto his fellow Whigs' measure for reestablishing a national bank, he found himself deserted by his cabinet, formally read out of his party, and branded ‘His Accidency’ by former allies.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 978 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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