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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Daviston in Tallapoosa County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

The High Ground

Horseshoe Bend National Military Park

 
 
The High Ground Marker image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
1. The High Ground Marker
Inscription.
[The] high ground which extended about mid-way from the breastwork to the river was in some manner open, but the declivity and flat which surrounded it was filled with fallen timber, the growth of which was very heavy, and had been so arrayed that every tree afforded them... a communication or cover to the next, and so on to the river bank...
Col. Gideon Morgan, Cherokee Regiment

Throughout the afternoon of Mach 27th this area was the scene of brutal and deadly close combat. The Red Sticks planned to use this high ground as a key battle position-their second line of defense. Here they gathered fallen trees to provide cover in the event of a fighting retreat from their first line, a log barricade, or breastwork, positioned behind you.

But Cherokee and Lower Creek warriors allied with Andrew Jackson attacked them from behind, crossing the river and pushing through the village, burning huts as they passed. Once they gained this ground the Red Sticks were trapped and forced to fight to the last or attempt escape to the river.
 
Erected by National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 32° 58.183′ N, 85° 44.395′ W. Marker is near Daviston, Alabama, in Tallapoosa
The High Ground Marker image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
2. The High Ground Marker
County. Marker can be reached from Battlefield Park Tour Road, on the left. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 11288 Horseshoe Bend Road, Daviston AL 36256, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. With Deer Tails in Their Hair (approx. 0.2 miles away); Tohopeka in Flames (approx. 0.2 miles away); They Fought to the Last (approx. ¼ mile away); While the Long Roll Was Beating (approx. 0.4 miles away); Charge! (approx. 0.4 miles away); Designed for Defense (approx. 0.4 miles away); Major Lemuel P. Montgomery (approx. half a mile away); Jackson Trace (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Daviston.
 
More about this marker. Tour Stop #4; Tohopeka Village

Tohopeka (meaning fort or fortification) was a temporary Red Stick village begun several months before the battle. The warriors’ families wintered here in log huts while the men built the barricade across the peninsula. The women and children stayed here during the battle. The Cherokees burned Tohopeka during their assault on the Red Sticks’ position. After the fighting ended, 350 Red Sticks women and children were taken prisoner. A short trail leads to the overlook shelter.

From Horseshoe Bend National Military Park Map and Guide Brochure.
 
Also see . . .
The High Ground Marker and overlook shelter. image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
3. The High Ground Marker and overlook shelter.
 Horseshoe Bend National Military Park. (Submitted on September 24, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Native AmericansWars, US Indian
 
Image of theTohopeka village as seen from the overlook. image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
4. Image of theTohopeka village as seen from the overlook.
After a day of hunting, Creek men return to Tohopeka. In the fall of 1813, Upper Creek families from nearby towns gathered for protection in this bend of the Tallapoosa River.
Site of the Red Stick's village Tohopeka viewed from the overlook. image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
5. Site of the Red Stick's village Tohopeka viewed from the overlook.
Dense woods behind The High Ground Marker image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
6. Dense woods behind The High Ground Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 536 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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