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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Bethel Methodist Church

 
 
Bethel Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 14, 2011
1. Bethel Methodist Church Marker
Inscription.
Bethel Methodist Church
lot donated by
Thomas Bennett
A.D. 1795
Church dedicated 1798
Moved across street
for use of colored
people and present
church dedicated
Aug. 7, 1853
Parsonage once
occupied by
Bishop Francis Asbury
1st M. Church in city
The Blue Meeting House
was in [sic]
Cumberland Street

 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Francis Asbury, Traveling Methodist Preacher marker series.
 
Location. 32° 47.039′ N, 79° 56.453′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Pitt Street near Calhoun Street, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 57 Pitt Street, Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Old Bethel Methodist Church (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Old Bethel United Methodist Church (about 300 feet away); Benjamin Lucas House (about 500 feet away); William Blacklock House (about 600 feet away); Cameron House (about 600 feet away); 66 Bull Street The John Cart House
Bethel Methodist Church on Pitt Street image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 14, 2011
2. Bethel Methodist Church on Pitt Street
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Kornahrens-Guenveur House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Nine College Way (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Charleston.
 
Regarding Bethel Methodist Church. National Register of Historic Places:
Bethel Methodist Church (added 1974 - - #74002260)
♦ Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering
♦ Architectural Style: Greek Revival
♦ Period of Significance: 1850-1874
Bethel Methodist Church (built 1853-1854), located on the site of Charleston’s first Methodist church building, is an exceptional example of antebellum Greek Revival ecclesiastical architecture. Except for the rather steeply pitched roof, the church is one of the better examples of Greek Doric temple architecture in the state. Of stuccoed brick painted white, the building has a massive, giant-order hexastyle Doric portico with a simple Doric pediment and entablature. Designed by a Mr. Curtis, Bethel Church has pilastered walls, and there is one tier of large windows on each side of the structure; the building has a gabled roof and a main entrance which is pedimented with consoles. The roof is more steeply pitched than is usual in a Doric temple
Bethel Methodist Church Marker, seen at far left image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 14, 2011
3. Bethel Methodist Church Marker, seen at far left
to allow rainwater to drain more quickly, thus helping to eliminate the possibility of leaks. The portico withstood the 1886 earthquake intact and stands today unaltered. The auditorium-plan interior has a cove ceiling. The church has a cemetery with crepe myrtles on the north side. Listed in the National Register November 20, 1974. (South Carolina Department of Archives and History)
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.
 
Bethel Methodist Church National Register Medallion image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 14, 2011
4. Bethel Methodist Church National Register Medallion
Bethel Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 14, 2011
5. Bethel Methodist Church
Medallion for United Methodist
Historic Site No. 220
Bethel Methodist Church, Pitt  and Calhoun Streets image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 14, 2011
6. Bethel Methodist Church, Pitt and Calhoun Streets
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 436 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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