Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Athens, Attica Periphery, Greece — Central Greece (Roúmeli)
 

Areopagus Hill

 
 
Areopagus Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 20, 2011
1. Areopagus Hill Marker
Inscription.
[Left columns - text in Greek]
[Right columns - text in English]

The Areopagus, a rocky outcrop approximately 115 m. high is situated between three other hills, the Acropolis, the Pnyx, and the Kolonos Agoraios. Its name probably derives from Ares, the god of war, and the Ares-Erinyes or Semnes (also called the Eumenides), underground goddesses of punishment and revenge. A judicial body, the Areopagus Council, met on this hill to preside over cases of murder, sacrilege, and arson. The Areopagus was also a place of religious worship. Among the several sanctuaries located here was that of the Semnes or Eumenides, probably located in a cavity at the northeast side of the hill.

In the Mycenaean and Geometric periods (1600-700 B.C.) the northern slope of the hill served as a cemetery which contained both vaulted tombs and simple cist graves.

From the 6th century B.C. onwards the hillside as a whole became a residential quarter belonging to the fashionable district of Melite. Cuttings still evident in the bedrock attest to the district’s many roads, wells, drains, reservoirs, floors, and irregular buildings. Access to this neighbourhood was provided by stairways cut right into the living rock.

By the Late Roman period (4th-6th centuries A.C.) four luxury houses, which probably
Areopagus Hill Marker - with the Acropolis Hill in background image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 19, 2011
2. Areopagus Hill Marker - with the Acropolis Hill in background
served as philosophical schools – located at the north slope of the hill – had supplanted the houses of the Classical era.

The Areopagus is also associated with the spread of Christianity into Greece. Some time near the middle of the 1st century A.C. the Apostle Paul is said to have converted a number [of] Athenians by teaching the tenets of the new religion from the summit of the hill. Among the converts was Dionysios the Areopagite, the patron saint of the City of Athens, who according to tradition, was the city’s first bishop. Remains of a church named in his honor are preserved on the northern slope of the hill.

The Church of St. Dionysios the Areopagite was a three-aisled basilica with a narthex at west central apse, diakonikon (the apse terminating the southern aisle) and prosthesis (the apse terminating the northern aisle). Built in the middle of the 16th century, it was probably destroyed by an earthquake in 1601. The church and grounds were completely enclosed to the north and west by the monumental Archbishop’s Palace. This two-storey Palace was built between the middle of the 16th and end of the 17th century and consisted of a complex of rooms which included warehouses, a kitchen, a dining hall, and two wine presses.
 
Location. 37° 58.333′ N, 23° 43.417′ 
Close up of illustrations on the Areopagus Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 19, 2011
3. Close up of illustrations on the Areopagus Hill Marker
- the floor plan and a restored drawing of the Church of St. Dionysios the Areopagite and the Archbishop’s Palace (16th century).
E. Marker is in Athens, Attica Periphery. Marker is on Theorias Street north of Dionysiou Areopagitou Street, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. The marker is accessible to pedestrians on the hiker trail in the Parko Thiseio west of the Acropolis complex. Marker is in this post office area: Athens, Attica Periphery 10555, Greece.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Acropolis of Athens (within shouting distance of this marker); A. The Propylaia, B. The Shrine of Athena Hygieia and Hygieia (about 180 meters away, measured in a direct line in Attica Region); The Statue of Athena Promachos (about 180 meters away in Attica Region); A. The Sanctuary of Artemis Brauronia, B. The Chalkotheke (about 180 meters away in Attica Region); The Parthenon (about 210 meters away in Attica Region); The "Old Temple" of Athena (approx. 0.2 kilometers away in Attica Region); The Erechtheion (approx. 0.3 kilometers away in Attica Region).
 
More about this marker. On the top left are diagrams with the captions, “Church of St. Dionysios, the Areopagite and Archbishop’s Palace. Restored Plan” and “The Ancient Agora and its Environs in the 2nd cent. A.C.”

On the top right is an illustration with the caption, “Restored Drawing of the Church of St. Dionysios the Areopagite and the Archbishop’s
Monument with the engraved text of St. Paul's Sermon on "Mars Hill" (Acts 17:16–34) image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 19, 2011
4. Monument with the engraved text of St. Paul's Sermon on "Mars Hill" (Acts 17:16–34)
near the Areopagus Hill Marker
Palace (16th century)"
 
Also see . . .
1. Athens: Aeropagus Hill. (Submitted on June 30, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Ancient Agora of Athens (aka the Forum of Athens). (Submitted on June 30, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
3. Areopagus. ... The Areopagus, like most city-state institutions, continued to function in Roman times, and it was from this location, drawing from the potential significance of the Athenian altar to the Unknown God, that the Apostle Paul is said to have delivered the famous speech, "Now what you worship as something unknown I am going to proclaim to you. The God who made the world and everything in it is the Lord of heaven and earth and does not live in temples built by hands." (Acts 17:24) (Submitted on September 29, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. Areos Pagos; Hill of Ares; Mars Hill; St. Paul, the Apostle; Athina; Hellenic Republic; council of elders; Athens Agora; Parko Thiselo; Filopappos/Philopappou Hill
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Notable Places
 
Tourists on the marble outcrop, Areopagus Hill, Athens image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 19, 2011
5. Tourists on the marble outcrop, Areopagus Hill, Athens
Filopappos/Philopappou Hill - in view to the southwest from Areopagus Hill image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 19, 2011
6. Filopappos/Philopappou Hill - in view to the southwest from Areopagus Hill
- the prominent monument on the crest of the hill (earlier known as Mousaeion Hill or "Hill of the Muses") is the funeral stele of the Roman consul Gaius Ioulius Antiochus Philopappos (115 A.D.) for whom the hill is named.
The Ancient Agora on Pynx Hill, the seat of Athenian Democracy during the Golden Age image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 19, 2011
7. The Ancient Agora on Pynx Hill, the seat of Athenian Democracy during the Golden Age
- view westward from Areopagus Hill. Note the Temple of Hepaestus, center middle.
Areopagus Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
8. Areopagus Hill Marker
Areopagus Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
9. Areopagus Hill Marker
View of the marker on the top of Areopagus Hill, with a view of the Acropolis in the background.
Areopagus Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
10. Areopagus Hill Marker
A more distant view of the marker on the top of Areopagus Hill, with a view of the Acropolis in the background.
Areopagus Hill image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
11. Areopagus Hill
View, on the left, of the steps that lead up to the top of Areopagus Hill, and on the right, the bronze tablet with the engraved text of St. Paul's Sermon from "Mars Hill," that is found in Acts 17:16–34.
Areopagus Hill image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 22, 2015
12. Areopagus Hill
View looking down on Areopagus Hill, as seen from the Acropolis.
Areopagus Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 23, 2015
13. Areopagus Hill Marker
A panoramic view of the landscape as seen from the top of Areopagus Hill.
Nymph's Hill, seen to the northwest from Areopagus Hill image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 19, 2011
14. Nymph's Hill, seen to the northwest from Areopagus Hill
- note the National Observatory of Athens on the crest of the hill, left, upper middle.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,078 times since then and 15 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   12, 13. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   14. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement