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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Las Vegas in Clark County, Nevada — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

First Water Company

 
 
First Water Company Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, September 26, 2011
1. First Water Company Marker
Inscription.
1905 - 1908
City of Las Vegas
Diamond Jubilee
From within this area flowing artesian springs and wells provided the lifeblood to the valley and it settlers.
This abundant supply of water has been the most important asset in the establishment, development and growth of the city of Las Vegas and the Las Vegas Valley.
 
Erected 1980.
 
Location. 36° 9.566′ N, 115° 11.519′ W. Marker is in Las Vegas, Nevada, in Clark County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of South Valley View Boulevard and West Charleston Boulevard. Click for map. Marker is in the southwest corner of the parking lot. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1001 South Valley View Boulevard, Las Vegas NV 89153, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Old Well Tower #10 (a few steps from this marker); Las Vegas Springs (approx. ¾ mile away); a different marker also named Las Vegas Springs (approx. ¾ mile away); Lorenzi Park (approx. 1.4 miles away); Padre Francisco Garcés (approx. 1.5 miles away); Twin Lakes Lodge
First Water Company Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, September 26, 2011
2. First Water Company Marker
(approx. 1.5 miles away); Binion House (approx. 1.7 miles away); Kim Produce Farm (approx. 1.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Las Vegas.
 
Regarding First Water Company. The following text is from a 2005 Centennial Marker that is missing.

Water
The San Pedro, Salt Lake and Los Angeles Railroad bought Helen Stewart's Las Vegas Ranch in 1902, giving it control of the Las Vegas Springs and the water supply needed for the creation of Las Vegas in 1905. The railroad's subsidiary, the Las Vegas Land and Water Company, regulated water use. Early delivery to residents was inconsistent, often due to the use of redwood pipes. The valley was dotted with artesian wells; unfortunately many were uncapped, contributing to the depletion of the water table. The building of Hoover Dam and Lake Mead in the 1930s eventually provided a permanent, stable water supply for the valley. The Las Vegas Land and Water Company sold the facilities and rights to the Las Vegas Valley Water District in 1954. After some delays, Lake Mead water finally flowed into Las Vegas by 1955. The availability of water, always critical in the growth of Las Vegas, continues to determine the valley's future.
 
Categories. Natural Resources
 
First Water Company Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, September 26, 2011
3. First Water Company Marker
Marker is on the left by the tree.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 381 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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