Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Thomas Bee's House

94 Church Street

 

—circa 1730 —

 
Thomas Bee's House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2011
1. Thomas Bee's House Marker
Inscription.
Thomas Bee, a leader in the
colonial government and
a patriot of the Revolution,
built this fine house about
1730. A later owner was
Governor Joseph Alston
and his wife, Theodosia,
daughter of Aaron Burr.
She was mysteriously lost
at sea in 1812.
The Nullification Movement
that split the nation
started here in 1832.
John C. Calhoun, S.C. Governor
Robert Hayne, General James
Hamilton and other leaders
drafted the nullification
papers in the second floor
drawing room. The first
floor sitting room was the
location of the original
headquarters of Historic
Charleston Foundation.

 
Erected 2003 by Preservation Society of Charleston.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the South Carolina, Preservation Society of Charleston marker series.
 
Location. 32° 46.533′ N, 79° 55.733′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Church Street, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 94 Church Street, Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ann Peacock House (here, next to
Thomas Bee's House<br>Also Known as the Cooper-Bee House image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2011
2. Thomas Bee's House
Also Known as the Cooper-Bee House
Protected by a Conservation Easement donated to Historic Charleston Foundation 1982
this marker); Alexander Christie House (within shouting distance of this marker); Thomas Legare House (within shouting distance of this marker); Poinsett Tavern (within shouting distance of this marker); Heyward-Washington House (within shouting distance of this marker); 83-85 Church Street (within shouting distance of this marker); 26 Tradd Street (within shouting distance of this marker); 23 Tradd Street (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); William Mills Tenement (about 300 feet away); DuBose Heyward House (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Charleston.
 
Also see . . .
1. Joseph Alston. Joseph Alston (1779 – September 19, 1816) was the 44th Governor of South Carolina from 1812 to 1814. (Submitted on October 5, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Theodosia Burr Alston. Theodosia Burr Alston (June 21, 1783 – probably January 2 or 3, 1813) was the daughter of Theodosia
Thomas Bee's House image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2011
3. Thomas Bee's House
Bartow Prevost and the controversial U.S. Vice President Aaron Burr. (Submitted on October 5, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Aaron Burr. Aaron Burr, Jr. (February 6, 1756 – September 14, 1836) was an important political figure in the early history of the United States of America. (Submitted on October 5, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Nullification Crisis. The Nullification Crisis was a sectional crisis during the presidency of Andrew Jackson created by South Carolina's 1832 Ordinance of Nullification. (Submitted on October 5, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Ordinance of Nullification. The Ordinance of Nullification declared the Tariff of 1828 and 1832 null and void within the state borders of South Carolina. (Submitted on October 5, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. John C. Calhoun. John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading politician and political theorist from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. (Submitted on October 5, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. Robert Y. Hayne. Robert Young Hayne (November 10, 1791 – September 24, 1839) was an American political leader. (Submitted on October 5, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
Theodosia Burr Alston<br>June 21, 1783 – probably January 2 or 3, 1813 image. Click for full size.
By John Vanderlyn, 1802
4. Theodosia Burr Alston
June 21, 1783 – probably January 2 or 3, 1813
 

8. James Hamilton, Jr. James Hamilton, Jr. (May 8, 1786 – November 15, 1857) was an American lawyer and politician. (Submitted on October 5, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

9. Historic Charleston Foundation. Established in 1947, Historic Charleston Foundation is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to preserve and protect the historical, architectural and material culture that make up Charleston's rich and irreplaceable heritage. (Submitted on October 6, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraPatriots & PatriotismPolitics
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 820 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement