Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Seattle in King County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

Ballast Island

Historical Point of Interest

 
 
Ballast Island Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 17, 2011
1. Ballast Island Marker
Inscription. In this area once part of the bay, vessels from ports all over the world dumped their ballast. Untold thousands of tons were unloaded into the water by ship’s crews including 40,000 tons from San Francisco’s Telegraph Hill.

The island, long a gathering place for Indians on their annual migrations, was covered in the 1890’s by construction of Railroad Avenue (now called Alaskan Way).
 
Erected by The Yukon Club and Propeller Club.
 
Location. 47° 36.037′ N, 122° 20.173′ W. Marker is in Seattle, Washington, in King County. Marker is at the intersection of Alaskan Way South and South Washington Street, on the right when traveling south on Alaskan Way South. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 201 Alaskan Way South, Seattle WA 98104, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Indians Attack Seattle! Jan. 26, 1856 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Seattle’s First Pier (about 300 feet away); Maynard Building (about 500 feet away); Schwabacher’s Store (about 500 feet away); Grand Central Hotel (about 500 feet
Ballast Island Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 17, 2011
2. Ballast Island Marker
away); Smith and Squire Buildings (about 700 feet away); Mutual Life Building (about 700 feet away); Pioneer Square Historic District (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Seattle.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 466 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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