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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Beatrice in Gage County, Nebraska — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Fighting Communism - Korea and the Cold War

We Answered the Call

 

1861 - Today

 
Fighting Communism - Korea and the Cold War Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., May 30, 2011
1. Fighting Communism - Korea and the Cold War Marker
Inscription.
June 25, 1950, Communist North Korea invades South Korea and the Korean War begins. The United Nations asks member nations to aid South Korea. President Truman sends U.S. air and naval forces to South Korean defense. Regular Army troops move from Germany and Japan to Korea and many Veterans of WWII continue to serve. The fighting is over in 1953 when the U.N. and North Korea sign a truce.

It was clear from the Korean conflict that the United States had become the leader of the free world, the only nation strong enough to contain Communism. After 1953, use of armed forces to support our foreign affairs became standard.

Homeland defense became necessary as escalating development of nuclear weapons by both the Soviet Union and the United States created tension. Defense systems included building anti-aircraft missile bases throughout the country and cooperating with Canada to set up the Distant Early Warning (DEW) radar network to guard against Soviet missiles.

[Some photo captions follow]
This was one of the bloodiest wars in history; over a million South Korean civilians were killed. More than 37,000 Americans were killed or missing and 103,000 wounded. A permanent peace treaty has never been signed between North and South Korea.

Weather extremes, ranging from over 100 degrees in summer to 40
Fighting Communism - Korea and the Cold War Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., May 30, 2011
2. Fighting Communism - Korea and the Cold War Marker
Looking NNE toward the 6th Street Bridge over the Big Blue River
degrees below zero in winter, made fighting challenging for U.S. troops.

During the 1960's, the 551st Strategic Missile Squadron maintained 12 missile sites in Southeast Nebraska. This photo, taken in 1960, shows an Atlas missile on display in Lincoln.

The Ground Observation Corp[s] lookout tower at 9th and Dorsey was put into use January 23, 1956 as part of homeland security.
 
Location. 40° 15.3′ N, 96° 44.81′ W. Marker is in Beatrice, Nebraska, in Gage County. Click for map. Marker is along the walking path in Beatrice Veterans Memorial Park, at South 6th Street (US Hwy 77) and Veterans Memorial Drive. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1050 South 6th Street, Beatrice NE 68310, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Veterans Memorial Drive (a few steps from this marker); World War I (within shouting distance of this marker); Beatrice's Own - Company C 134th Infantry Regiment Nebraska National Guard (within shouting distance of this marker); Containing Communism - The Berlin and Cuban Crises and Vietnam (within shouting distance of this marker); Freedom Fighters (within shouting distance of this marker); War Efforts at Home (within shouting distance of this marker); Beatrice's Own - Civil War and the Spanish-American War (within shouting distance of this marker); Beatrice Veterans Memorial Wall of Honor (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Beatrice.
 
Also see . . .  Beatrice Veterans Memorial Park. (Submitted on October 13, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Air & SpacePatriots & PatriotismWar, Korean
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 526 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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