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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Louisa in Louisa County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Battle of Trevilians

 
 
Battle of Trevilians Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 12, 2008
1. Battle of Trevilians Marker
Inscription. Here, on June 12, 1864, Sheridan's cavalry, coming from Trevilians, attacked Wade Hampton, who had taken position across the road. A bloody engagement followed. Fitz Lee joined Hampton, and the Union cavalry was driven back. That night Sheridan retired eastward.
 
Erected 1928 by Conservation & Development Commission. (Marker Number W 209.)
 
Location. 38° 3.079′ N, 78° 4.589′ W. Marker is near Louisa, Virginia, in Louisa County. Marker is at the intersection of Louisa Road (U.S. 33) and Trevilians Square, on the right when traveling east on Louisa Road. Click for map. Located at a pull off at the intersection, on the south side of the highway. Marker is in this post office area: Louisa VA 23093, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Battle of Trevillians (here, next to this marker); Trevilian Station Battle (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Custer Rescued (about 700 feet away); Custer's First Last Stand (about 700 feet away); Netherland Tavern (approx. one mile away); Ogg Farm (approx. 1.5 miles away); Bibb's Crossroads (approx. 2.9 miles away); Green Springs (approx. 3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Louisa.
 
Regarding Battle of Trevilians.
Battle of Trevilians Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 12, 2008
2. Battle of Trevilians Marker
If one looks carefully, the nearby Virginia State marker W-210 can be seen on the left of the highway in the distance.
This is one of several markers interpreting the Battle of Trevilian Station, June 11-12, 1864. See the Battle of Trevilian Station Virtual Tour by Markers linked below for additional related markers.
 
Also see . . .
1. Trevilian Station Battlefield Foundation. The foundation has worked to preserve the remaining sections of the battlefield. A detailed driving tour of the battlefield is offered. (Submitted on January 20, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Battle of Trevilian Station. National Park Service summary of the battle. (Submitted on January 20, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Battle of Trevilian Station Virtual Tour by Markers. A set markers that document the Battle of Trevilian Station, June 11-12, 1864. The order of appearance is generally aligned to the National Parks Service and Trevilian Station Foundation driving tours. (Submitted on January 21, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

4. Trevilian Station Preservation Efforts. Civil War Preservation Trust continues efforts to set aside portions of the battlefield. Their site discussing the effort offers a wealth of background information about the battle, an article by noted historian Eric Wittenberg, and excellent maps of the battle. (Submitted on November 25, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
Ogg Farm - Second Day Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 12, 2008
3. Ogg Farm - Second Day Battlefield
Looking to the south of the Virginia Central Railroad. Fitzhugh Lee's Confederate division arrived from a round about march from Louisa, and formed the right flank of the Confederate defensive line.
 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Fitzhugh Lee's Flanking Attack image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 12, 2008
4. Fitzhugh Lee's Flanking Attack
Late in the afternoon, as Confederate General Matthew Butler's Brigade held off attacks at the Bloody Angle, General Fitzhugh Lee dispatched Lomax's Brigade from his division on a march around to the west to flank the Federals. Lomax passed through the grounds of what is today the Trevilians Elementary School and attacked the exposed Federal right (western) flank. This action broke the Federal lines and effectively ended the battle.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,030 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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