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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Guilderland in Albany County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Frederick Crounse

 
 
Frederick Crounse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 6, 2011
1. Frederick Crounse Marker
Inscription.
Farm of
Frederick Crounse
Officer 3D Albany Co. Militia
in Revolution. Carried food
to Army Battle of Saratoga.
Buried Here

 
Erected 1932 by New York State Education Department.
 
Location. 42° 40.843′ N, 74° 1.131′ W. Marker is in Guilderland, New York, in Albany County. Marker is on Altamont-Voorheesville Road (New York State Route 156) near Brandle Road, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 843 Route 156, Guilderland NY 12084, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Jacob Van Aernam (approx. 0.4 miles away); Captain Jacob Van Aernam (approx. half a mile away); Altamont High School (approx. 1.4 miles away); Family Cemetery (approx. 1.5 miles away); Inn of George Severson (approx. 1.5 miles away); Severson House (approx. 1.6 miles away); Old Plank Road (approx. 1.6 miles away); Altamont (approx. 1.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Guilderland.
 
Regarding Frederick Crounse. Frederick Crounse, the emigrant to America, was born in Germany, died in the Helderberg region, now the town of Guilderland, Albany County,
Frederick Crounse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 6, 2011
2. Frederick Crounse Marker
Looking north on Route 156
New York, April 16, 1828. He was a shoemaker by trade; he settled first at Rhinebeck, New York. He married Anna Barbara , who died March 6, 1823, aged seventy-six years, two months and twenty-three days. Becoming dissatisfied with conditions and prospects he broke up his home and started to find a new one north or west. On foot, with perhaps one team of oxen, they traversed the wild region west of the Hudson until finally under the rugged rocks and mountains of the Helderbergs the mother's fortitude and courage gave way. She refused to proceed further and compelled her husband to choose a location in that valley, which he did, not far from the present village of Altamont. He secured a tract of land containing several hundred acres from the Van Rensselaers, paying a nominal lease; later his descendants came into soil possession by title and deed. He cut logs on his own land with which the first house was built, making a little clearing to which field by field was added as the years rolled on. He did not live to accomplish a great amount himself, but he laid the foundations on which six succeeding generations have built, and founded a race of hardy men and women, who have honorably borne the Crounse name. Wherever in this narrative the "old homestead" is referred to, the tract first reclaimed from its wild conditions by the sturdy German emigrant and his plucky wife is meant. Frederick
Frederick Crounse Home image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 6, 2011
3. Frederick Crounse Home
The Frederick Crounse House, bugun circa 1760, was added to the National Register in 1982.
Crounse was drafted in the revolution and rendered service. At the first town meeting held in Guilderland, April 5, 1803, he was chosen commissioner of highways. He-left sons and daughters. The family were members of the German Lutheran church and clung to their church and mother tongue always, speaking German in their personal intercourse for two and three generations. The family religion has remained Lutheran through all the generations, while the family politics have been Whig and Republican, the latter day Crounses being particularly strong in their Republican sentiments.

The Frederick Crounse House, begun circa 1760, was added to the national register in 1982. "The Crounse House is significant as one of the earliest structures in the town, as well as for its Federal period additions and for its association with a notable community figure. Its early barn contributes to the character of the farmhouse."
 
Also see . . .  Crounse Homestead - Historic American Building Survey. (Submitted on October 16, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesPatriots & PatriotismSettlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary
 
Frederick Crounse House image. Click for full size.
Historic American Building Survey
4. Frederick Crounse House
Frederick Crounse House image. Click for full size.
Historic American Building Survey
5. Frederick Crounse House
The small wing of the home in the back made of stone is thought to be the original section of the home.
<center>"<b>Buried Here</b>" - Frederick Crounse Farm Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 15, 2011
6.
"Buried Here" - Frederick Crounse Farm Cemetery
This small family cemetery plot is located a short distance behind the Crounse homestead.
Frederick Crounse Gravestone image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 15, 2011
7. Frederick Crounse Gravestone
In Memory of
Frederick Crounse
who died
April 16, 1828,
aged
81 years, 5 months and 2 days.
He was an Ensign in the Revolution.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 692 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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