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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Cascade in El Paso County, Colorado — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

The Continental Divide

 
 
The Continental Divide Marker, at the summit of Pikes Peak image. Click for full size.
By Michael Stroud, May 1994
1. The Continental Divide Marker, at the summit of Pikes Peak
Inscription. The Rocky Mountains are the longest chain of mountains in the world. They divide the United States watershed between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Colorado has 53 peaks over 14,000 feet. One inch on the Horizon equals about 38 miles.
 
Location. 38° 50.431′ N, 105° 2.504′ W. Marker is near Cascade, Colorado, in El Paso County. Marker is on Pikes Peak Hwy. Click for map. Located at the summit of Pikes Peak. Marker is in this post office area: Cascade CO 80809, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Zebulon Montgomery Pike (here, next to this marker); Pike's Peak (a few steps from this marker); America the Beautiful (within shouting distance of this marker); A Look From The Top (approx. 0.7 miles away); Race to the Clouds (approx. 3 miles away); From Carriages to Corvettes (approx. 3 miles away); Amazing Pikes Peak Feats (approx. 3 miles away); Donít kill them with kindness (approx. 3 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia entry for Continental Divide. A continental divide is a line of elevated terrain which forms a border between two watersheds such that water falling on one side of the line eventually travels to one ocean or body of water, and water on the other side travels to another, generally on the opposite side of the continent. (Submitted on January 20, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
Looking Eastward, Colorado Springs seen below image. Click for full size.
By Michael Stroud, May 1994
2. Looking Eastward, Colorado Springs seen below
Atlantic Ocean Watershed; rainfall on this side eventually reaches the Atlantic Ocean.

1. Continential Divide
The divide runs along the crest of the Rockies, from British Columbia, through the United States, and continues southward into Mexico and Central America. It divides the continent's principal drainage into that flowing eastward (to the Hudson Bay in Canada or to the Mississippi River) and that flowing westward (to the Pacific Ocean).
    — Submitted January 20, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.

 
Categories. ExplorationNatural FeaturesNatural Resources
 
Looking Westward, from summit of Pikes Peak image. Click for full size.
By Michael Stroud, May 1994
3. Looking Westward, from summit of Pikes Peak
Pacific Ocean Watershed; rainfall on this side eventually reaches the Pacific Ocean.
The Cog Railway, 1994 style image. Click for full size.
By Michael Stroud, circa 1994
4. The Cog Railway, 1994 style
Manitou and Pikes Peak Railroad cars. image. Click for more information.
June 30, 2007
5. Manitou and Pikes Peak Railroad cars.
A cog railroad takes tourist to the summit.
Click for more information.
Pikes Peak Summit image. Click for full size.
July 18, 2007
6. Pikes Peak Summit
Altitude 14,110 ft.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 5,366 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   5, 6. submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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