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Louisa in Louisa County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Decisive Confederate Victory

The Largest All-Cavalry Battle of the Western Hemisphere

 
 
Decisive Confederate Victory Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 12, 2008
1. Decisive Confederate Victory Marker
Inscription. The Battle of Trevilian Station
Confederate Gen. Wade Hampton's victory over Gen. Philip H. Sheridan at Trevilian Station on June 11-12, 1864, prevented Sheridan from joining Gen. David Hunter and destroying the Virginia Central Railroad at Charlottesville. Gen. Jubal A. Early's Second Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia then used the railroad to reach Lynchburg in time to repulse Hunter on July 17-18 [See more about this marker below]. Trevilian Station was the largest all-cavalry battle of the Civil War. "The Battle of Trevilians," wrote Hampton's chief of artillery, was important "because, if lost, General [Robert E.] Lee and his whole army would have been without supplies. Trevilians was so important to General Lee that he was enabled thereby to stay in Petersburg for nearly a year longer." A month after the battle, Lee requested that Hampton be promoted to permanent command of the cavalry corps because of his victory here.

Both sides suffered heavy losses. Of Sheridan's force of 9,000 cavalrymen, and 400 horse artillerists, 95 were killed, 445 wounded, and 410 missing. This total of 950 was more than 10 percent of his total force. Hampton and Fitzhugh Lee lost 813 men out of 6,000 cavalrymen and 400 horse artillerists engaged resulting in a casualty rate of more than 12 percent. Sheridan withdrew
Battle Area Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 12, 2008
2. Battle Area Map
eastward and rejoined the Army of the Potomac on June 18, 1864. Hampton and his command followed, slowed by the exhaustion of his men and horse and the lack of supplies.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 1.723′ N, 78° 0.69′ W. Marker is in Louisa, Virginia, in Louisa County. Marker is on West Street (County Route 666), on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Located at the entrance gate to Oakland Cemetery. This is stop nine of the driving tour of Trevilian Station Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Louisa VA 23093, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Oakland Cemetery (here, next to this marker); Patrick Henry's Home (approx. half a mile away); Louisa Court House (approx. half a mile away); John Mercer Langston Birthplace (approx. 0.6 miles away); Hugh Hammond Bennett (1881-1960) (approx. 0.8 miles away); Historic Louisa (approx. 0.8 miles away); First Contact (approx. one mile away); Netherland Tavern (approx. 3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Louisa.
 
More about this marker. Portraits
Trevilian Station Battlefield Driving Tour Stop Nine image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Trevilian Station Battlefield Driving Tour Stop Nine
of Gens. Wade Hampton and Fitzhugh Lee are displayed in the lower center of the marker, beside a map detailing the tactical movements of the battle.

The marker's text incorrectly states the battle of Lynchburg was in July 17-18, 1864. The battle was in fact fought a month earlier, and just days after Trevilian Station, on June 17-18, 1864.
 
Regarding Decisive Confederate Victory. This is one of several markers interpreting the Battle of Trevilian Station, June 11-12, 1864. See the Battle of Trevilian Station Virtual Tour by Markers linked below for additional related markers.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Trevilian Station Virtual Tour by Markers. A set markers that document the Battle of Trevilian Station, June 11-12, 1864. The order of appearance is generally aligned to the National Parks Service and Trevilian Station Foundation driving tours. (Submitted on January 21, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Trevilian Station Battlefield Foundation. The foundation has worked to preserve the remaining sections of the battlefield. A detailed self-guided driving tour of the battlefield is offered. (Submitted on January 21, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Battle of Trevilian Station. National Park Service summary of the battle. (Submitted on January 21, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

4. Trevilian Station Preservation Efforts. Civil War Preservation Trust continues efforts to set aside portions of the battlefield. Their site discussing the effort offers a wealth of background information about the battle, an article by noted historian Eric Wittenberg, and excellent maps of the battle. (Submitted on November 25, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,757 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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